Dendroboard banner
1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have been keeping a group of N. kaiseri and N. strauchii for over a year now. They are both fantastic newts. I have to say I think our N. strauchii are more out going and active. They will come to the spoon at feeding time.
Here is a picture of their set-up. You can see a couple of them. I keep them aquatic all year. I will get pictures of them up close. They are beautiful newts. Not many keep them in the US.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,747 Posts
Hi Tim and Robin,

I have a group of N. kaiseri, but would love to add a group of these N. strauchii as well. They are really special (their spots remind me very much of our R. vanzolini, the little clowns of the dart frogs!)

Good luck with the breeding, Richard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,346 Posts
What temps are you keeping them at? The only reason I held of on aquiring some is the fear that they may not be as heat tolerant as the Kaiseri
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,747 Posts
Hi Roman,

There's a good thread about Tim and Robin's N. strauchii and its requirements over at Caudata.org.

Take care, Richard.

What temps are you keeping them at? The only reason I held of on aquiring some is the fear that they may not be as heat tolerant as the Kaiseri
 
  • Like
Reactions: johnc

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi Tim and Robin,

I have a group of N. kaiseri, but would love to add a group of these N. strauchii as well. They are really special (their spots remind me very much of our R. vanzolini, the little clowns of the dart frogs!)

Good luck with the breeding, Richard.
Hi Richard,

I will get some up close photos of them in the next couple of days. They are a very special rare newt. So far the breeding this year has been amazing. I have some larvae that have just hatched and more that are close. I will be making some available at very resonable prices once they have gone through metamorphosis. I have read that can take 3-4 months. I am excited to have these guys and that they are thriving here.

As for temps, we keep them the same as the N kaiseri. They are in the same room with identical temperatures. It seems they require cooler temps for breeding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,149 Posts
I've always wanted to acquire a few Neurergus strauchii strauchii. Henk Wallays gave a great presentation on them at IAD in 2004.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,747 Posts
Hi Tim and Robin,

Those are some nice shots! I think the way the black offsets their eyes makes them look very "wise" (talk about anthropomorhic!). It's very exciting to see how well the larvae are doing!

Good luck with them, Richard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
They are doing well and now are eating baby brine shrimp. They are very cute with an orange belly full of baby brine shrimp.

I will be making some available once they have gone through metamorphosis. PM me if you would like to get on the list of interested parties.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,747 Posts
Hi Tim and Robin,

Those babies look great! It's interesting to see the color differences in the fry. I see this when breeding different colors of Axolotls, but would not have imagined seeing them in the N. strauchii. Is it just from being slightly different ages?

Keep us updated on their progress, Richard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
It seems that they have lighten some once they start eating. They are certainly darker when they first hatch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
553 Posts
Did N. crocatus ever make it into the States? JVK
Are these the partial look-alikes to both kaiseri and strauchii? (kinda like the offspring if both of these mated)? I do remember seeing something that was not a strachii and definitely not a kaiseri (no orange feet). They were young and gorgeous and the MOST expensive newt I have seen to date. I don't truly recall where I saw these, in the past I was making 2 trips to Germany a year or here in the states. Their cost was $400 US each at the time. I must go through my pictures, I know I took some. The one person that would know for sure if these were in the States would be our resident expert, Mr. Schrom. I'm sure there are other 'newt/caudate' people out there that could also advise, just not sure of their names.

Peter Keane
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
553 Posts
I've always wanted to acquire a few Neurergus strauchii strauchii. Henk Wallays gave a great presentation on them at IAD in 2004.
I remember this presentation, It is part of my video library now.. somewhere, lol.. It was indeed a great speak...

Peter Keane
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,180 Posts
Are these the partial look-alikes to both kaiseri and strauchii? The one person that would know for sure if these were in the States would be our resident expert, Mr. Schrom. I'm sure there are other 'newt/caudate' people out there that could also advise, just not sure of their names.

Peter Keane
I'm sure these are Neurergus strauchii strauchii. I imported some c.b. a few years ago and others imported a small amount before. N. strauchii are not as easy to breed as N. kaiseri. As far as I know only a few people in the U.S. have bred strauchii. Their has been some talk about importing N. crocatus and N. microspilotus but I havn't seen any. I saw Henk's talk too. It was impressive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
The larvae are growing fast and doing well. Here is an updated photo of one. They are pretty hard to photograph, so not the best photo. You can see they have all four legs now. It is looking like there will be a few available when they have lost their gills! :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,747 Posts
Hi Tim and Robin,

I call DIBS! It's a great species and I am so happy that you are having success with such a sweet newt. They are the R. vanzoliniis of the newt world!

Take care, Richard.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top