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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
38x18x18 for Phyllobates Terribilis

Plants:

Pholodendron Brandtianum
Philodendron Grazielae
Epipremnum pinnatum ‘cebu blue’

Marcgravia red umbellata
Marcgravia ovate bronze
Marcgravia morona santiago copper
Marcgravia rectiflora

Cissus amazonica

Peperomia emarginella ‘old form’ ?

Microgramma lycopodioides
Microgramma sp. Ecuador ‘reptans’

Monolena sp. dark Ecuador
Pilea ‘moon valley’
Begonia soli-mutatai

How would you plant this, and would I be able to comfortable fit all three aroids? Or should I consider not planting the ‘cebu blue’?

Would you remove any of the other plants from this list?
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For terribs (mostly large, heavy terrestrial frogs), there will be little climbing. They prefer the floor, so it is key to maximize "horizontal" space for them. If they do climb, it will be small gradients (like that branch you have in there right now). They also prefer drier vivs (very prone to foot rot).

So, a few pointers:
  • Add a few larger "layers" - e.g. cork bark tubes, flat slabs that are accessible underneath and from above (like caves). Also works very well for tincs (pics below). They have the huge benefit of providing a nice hide and also doubling your floor space
  • Perhaps some more big "slanted" branches to the left side as well (not sure they will easily access that wood you have there
  • I've found they also like sitting on larger pieces of very hard wood that dries off quickly. Same with SMOOTH / sanded pumice rock
Plant-wise, I'd use only "robust" plants on the floor or close to it. Orchids (phaphs or bulbophyllums) also work great and also provide nice extra floor space on their leaves. Marcgravia may be quite expensive / damaged for these "violent" frogs; would stick to the larger vining plants.

Here is one of those examples with a horizontal cork slab in my tinc viv:
299310


And here it is in a broader side view of the viv (bottom left). You'll also see a big phaph (there are smaller ones available as well) in the middle - this one has a span of about 3.5 feet. A bulbophyllum is on top of that cork "tower". To the very far right is a holy ghost orchid (grows 2-3 feet tall and just as wide).

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My P. terribilis are almost 5 months old, but still climb all the way through the tank, up to the ridge, and at the top of the plants. Do put in some sturdy plants, they like to sit on the (wet) leaves.
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
For terribs (mostly large, heavy terrestrial frogs), there will be little climbing. They prefer the floor, so it is key to maximize "horizontal" space for them. If they do climb, it will be small gradients (like that branch you have in there right now). They also prefer drier vivs (very prone to foot rot).

So, a few pointers:
  • Add a few larger "layers" - e.g. cork bark tubes, flat slabs that are accessible underneath and from above (like caves). Also works very well for tincs (pics below). They have the huge benefit of providing a nice hide and also doubling your floor space
  • Perhaps some more big "slanted" branches to the left side as well (not sure they will easily access that wood you have there
  • I've found they also like sitting on larger pieces of very hard wood that dries off quickly. Same with SMOOTH / sanded pumice rock
Plant-wise, I'd use only "robust" plants on the floor or close to it. Orchids (phaphs or bulbophyllums) also work great and also provide nice extra floor space on their leaves. Marcgravia may be quite expensive / damaged for these "violent" frogs; would stick to the larger vining plants.

Here is one of those examples with a horizontal cork slab in my tinc viv:
View attachment 299310

And here it is in a broader side view of the viv (bottom left). You'll also see a big phaph (there are smaller ones available as well) in the middle - this one has a span of about 3.5 feet. A bulbophyllum is on top of that cork "tower". To the very far right is a holy ghost orchid (grows 2-3 feet tall an
For terribs (mostly large, heavy terrestrial frogs), there will be little climbing. They prefer the floor, so it is key to maximize "horizontal" space for them. If they do climb, it will be small gradients (like that branch you have in there right now). They also prefer drier vivs (very prone to foot rot).

So, a few pointers:
  • Add a few larger "layers" - e.g. cork bark tubes, flat slabs that are accessible underneath and from above (like caves). Also works very well for tincs (pics below). They have the huge benefit of providing a nice hide and also doubling your floor space
  • Perhaps some more big "slanted" branches to the left side as well (not sure they will easily access that wood you have there
  • I've found they also like sitting on larger pieces of very hard wood that dries off quickly. Same with SMOOTH / sanded pumice rock
Plant-wise, I'd use only "robust" plants on the floor or close to it. Orchids (phaphs or bulbophyllums) also work great and also provide nice extra floor space on their leaves. Marcgravia may be quite expensive / damaged for these "violent" frogs; would stick to the larger vining plants.

Here is one of those examples with a horizontal cork slab in my tinc viv:
View attachment 299310

And here it is in a broader side view of the viv (bottom left). You'll also see a big phaph (there are smaller ones available as well) in the middle - this one has a span of about 3.5 feet. A bulbophyllum is on top of that cork "tower". To the very far right is a holy ghost orchid (grows 2-3 feet tall and just as wide).

View attachment 299309
I do have like 10 lbs. of flats/rounds. I could definitely foam a large flat or two to the wall for a cave like feature! I was also planning on laying a few of the rounds along with the two coco huts I have. The Marcgravia are mainly just to fill in the hygrolon wall as I was going for a vining effect as well as something the philo's to climb. The lone branch was placed more for my OCD as I couldn't handle the one piece on just one side. I was hoping one of the airods I planted in that corner would climb up and out, then drape down. My main concern was having both the philodendron and the Cebu blue taking over and if namely the Cebu could/should just not be planted.
 

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You'll definitely have a lot of pruning once the phil and cebu take hold (at least in my experience). The marcgravias will also expand quite a bit once established.

I'd strongly recommend doing a bit of work with the cork flats / rounds; your darts will appreciate it.

One other thing you could try is a miniature rubber tree (not the ficus but the peperomia obtusifolia). The leaves are quite sturdy.
 
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