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Will frogs get louder?

264 Views 3 Replies 3 Participants Last post by  Hopout
I know that the answer will come on its own if I have a bit of patience, but curiosity has gotten the best of me, and I couldn't find an answer online.

I recently obtained a pair of unsexed CB juvenile Epipedobates anthonyi. To be honest, my intention is not to breed them, so I was secretly hoping that both frogs would turn out to be females as I am aware that the constant calling of males can become quite bothersome. However, I was aware that ending up with two males or a male-female pair was more likely than not, and I don't have any issues with that outcome; it's just not my preferred scenario.

I obtained them when they were still quite small, and in the three weeks since then, they have shown some growth. I'm not sure if it's relevant, but I currently house them in a 24x18x18 Exoterra vivarium I had at hand. Initially, I thought it would be more than sufficient, but now I find the dimensions lacking and I'll upgrade it to a bigger and (most importantly taller) size in the long run. The top of the vivarium is covered with glass panes, leaving about an inch uncovered. It has a drainage layer that I typically manually drain every two weeks, and the substrate consists mostly of orchid bark and a generous amount of leaf litter on top. I've added lots of plants and wood for decoration and climbing opportunities. For lighting, I'm using an LED aquarium light placed above the vivarium. I hand mist the enclosure with RO water once per day in the morning, and occasionally more if it seems a bit dry. The glass usually takes between 3-6 hours to clear, depending on the weather outside. Although the hygrometer consistently shows 99-100% relative humidity, I highly doubt it as the glass clears and the leaves dry in-between mistings. I mainly rely on it for checking the temperature, especially now that we're entering summer. The temperature in the vivarium has been ranging mostly between 70 and 75 °F, never above so far. As for their diet, I feed them everyday in adequate amounts, always dusting fruit flies with Dendrocare. Besides dwarf white isopods and a copious amount of springtails they have the enclosure just for themselves, although sometime some fungus gnats come uninvited.

Cutting to the chase, one of the frogs started calling a week ago, which surprised me since they still appear rather small to my inexperienced eye. The call is rather mellow and quiet, and the frog calls infrequently, never for more than 2 seconds at a time, sometimes a few times in succession (with generous pauses), and then usually stops. So, my question is, will the call get louder as the frog matures? Although I doubt it, is it possible that it's just the way this individual frog is? Alternatively, could there be a husbandry-related issue on my part?

Assuming the first option, is it the same with other louder poison dart frog species?

Thanks!
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I haven't worked with that species, but in my experience visiting some conservatories where they free roam, their call can be quite loud. I have noticed that my frogs (mostly Oophaga) call noticeably louder as the reach full maturity. My granulifera were similarly quiet when my male first started calling. Now I hear him calling away from the first floor of my house and my frogs are located in the basement.
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I liken it to a puppy trying to find it's bark. In my experience, a lot of young frogs, when they first start to call, produce little to no noise. I'm sure they'll get louder as they age.
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I haven't worked with that species, but in my experience visiting some conservatories where they free roam, their call can be quite loud. I have noticed that my frogs (mostly Oophaga) call noticeably louder as the reach full maturity. My granulifera were similarly quiet when my male first started calling. Now I hear him calling away from the first floor of my house and my frogs are located in the basement.
I liken it to a puppy trying to find it's bark. In my experience, a lot of young frogs, when they first start to call, produce little to no noise. I'm sure they'll get louder as they age.
Thank you for your responses. I anticipated the sound to grow louder, but I wanted to double-check. In certain previous discussions, there are mentions of frogs that begin their calls softly, while others are loud right from the start. I like the current volume and frequency of the calls, but let's just say it will help me to acclimate gradually before they become loud, you could say similar to the analogy of the boiling frog.
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