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I just purchased 2 D. tinctorius azureus from a breeder last week. Today I noticed one of them was slow to leave a wet area in my vivarium, was not quick to feed, and even allowed the other one to crawl all over it. Lastly to my horror there is a white spot on its back that was NOT there yesterday. I watch them a lot so this is a sudden change for me and I am more then worried....I am attaching 2 pictures. I know that the frog is on the thin side, its how they arrived, with the other one putting on a fair amount of weight in the last week.
 

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Looks like you were given a very sick (parasite)frog my friend. Contact breeder(hope not one from this board ) everyone here seems to take care if their animals . How's the other look .
 

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The other is very lively, and picking up weight really well. It looks like a normal tinc at this point. These are my first amphibians, normally I am a turtle enthusiast but I wanted to give the frogs a try. What should I do? will the little guys have any hope? The breeder I picked them up from were from an expo...I worried about getting frogs in the mail...
 

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This is a case were research would have helped not be in this situation. Im sure most people with some research would have not purchased these frogs looking like that. This one looks way thinner than normaI. I would rather get healthy frogs in the "mail" than these in person. Do you have them separated? If not you should. Are they in a quarantine tank? I hope someone else can shime in to help you with the spot as I have not experienced that. Hope it makes it, you really need to contact the vendor you got it from, although if it sold you these frogs they probably won't take responsibility since you purchased them in person. I hope I am wrong. Where are u located? Good luck.

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Make a separate hospital tank for the skinny one right away. Plastic shoe box damp paper towels (not bleached with chlorine) cut a paper cup for a hide (like coco hut) or a few pothos leaves. Feed sparingly so there is not a lot of ff crawling around. You can put a tiny piece of banana in and it will help keep the flies in one place. Maybe also shallow dish (like pringles lid) with water.

See if you can find an exotic vet in your area.

Most likely the other one will have what that sick one does.. just so you are prepared with that :-( Sorry you are off to a rough start.
 

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This is a case were research would have helped not be in this situation. Im sure most people with some research would have not purchased these frogs looking like that. This one looks way thinner than normaI. I would rather get healthy frogs in the "mail" than these in person. Do you have them separated? If not you should. Are they in a quarantine tank? I hope someone else can shime in to help you with the spot as I have not experienced that. Hope it makes it, you really need to contact the vendor you got it from, although if it sold you these frogs they probably won't take responsibility since you purchased them in person. I hope I am wrong. Where are u located? Good luck.

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Well...my goal was not to get shamed so much as find help. Its clear they are sick, as I am posting on this site asking for help.
 

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Well...my goal was not to get shamed so much as find help. Its clear they are sick, as I am posting on this site asking for help.
Not trying to shame, i know tone doesnt translate well in writing. just providing info. But you definitely want to separate them, and like the other person posted, its likely they both have something wrong with them even if the other doesn't have the spot.

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Not trying to shame, i know tone doesnt translate well in writing. just providing info. But you definitely want to separate them, and like the other person posted, its likely they both have something wrong with them even if the other doesn't have the spot.

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Alright, I am also on edge right now I'll admit. I have over 20 years of turtle experience so something like this really has me upset, as like I said this is my first foray into amphibians. Here are images of my other frog.
 

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A couple more things.. keep the hospital tank in the high 70s, you can tape dark paper or even newspaper around the outside of the container, it may help reduce stress. Also make sure you really hand wash after handling, feeding, etc. either frog and just in case, house them both away from your turtles.
 

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A couple more things.. keep the hospital tank in the high 70s, you can tape dark paper or even newspaper around the outside of the container, it may help reduce stress. Also make sure you really hand wash after handling, feeding, etc. either frog and just in case, house them both away from your turtles.
Will do as far as temperature and what not go. They are both kept far from the turtles, out of a paranoia of cross contamination. I have been doing really good on that front as I did research on how to house and care for them. I guess I just dropped the ball on how to grab healthy ones to start off with. This is a bit embarrassing because I'd never make the same mistake with reptiles.
 

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If that spot was not on the frog when you bought it, do not beat yourself up...I respect your trying to do the right thing and the fact you spent time researching is a plus. And until you see a skinny frog, as a new person to this endeavor...you may not realize that it IS a skinny frog...Good luck, sorry for the misfortune, and if the seller needs negative feedback...do so.
 

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Looks like you were given a very sick (parasite)frog my friend. Contact breeder(hope not one from this board ) everyone here seems to take care if their animals . How's the other look .
How do you know that the problem is due to parasites and not due to say chytridmycosis or a virus?

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They are both kept far from the turtles, out of a paranoia of cross contamination.
Cross contamination between amphibians and turtles is of lesser concern than say cross contamination between turtles and snakes or lizards. Amphibians are much less likely to succumb to ameobiasis from the turtles and vice versa. But quarantine is always a great idea.


I have been doing really good on that front as I did research on how to house and care for them. I guess I just dropped the ball on how to grab healthy ones to start off with. This is a bit embarrassing because I'd never make the same mistake with reptiles.
Sometimes you can't be sure that there is a problem with the animals right off the bat as the stress can either reduce the animals ability to resist infections or they have something that they were tolerating and the stress of sale, new enclosures etc reduce their immune function so what wasn't an issue takes off and causes symptoms. I wouldn't beat yourself up over this as this is what quarantine is for... to discover problems before it gets into your collection.

Has anyone considered that the white spot is actually close to the right color for the muscles of the frog? It could be due to a injury such as a scrape or predation an invertebrate like a cockroach or cricket. Or even to where there was an underlying infection of the skin causing the skin to slough off. The white spot may not have much if anything to do with the thinness of the frog.

If you can find an exotic vet or even one that is willing to work with you, an exam would be a really good idea as that would allow the vet to check the white spot to determine if it is due to a physical injury as opposed to an infection. I would also suggest getting some fecals done right away and get them checked as fresh as possible to see if there are blood cells or protozoal overgrowths in the fecal.

The changes in behavior are worrying as it can be an indication of severe problems.

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Where are you located? We might be able to help you find a vet in your area. Or, just look at the link in my signature. But do tell us where you are. If there are froggers nearby they may be able to give you more hands on assistance. We do want to help new people who come here.
 

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You bought those frogs from what we call a frog flipper, not always bad mind you but many buy animals they can not take care of and with dart frogs that means having food on hand to feed them. It is obvious this vendor had no dart frog food as those are extremely emaciated but the good news is they are more resilient than most think and at least the one is eating, several small meals per day will get your frog back into shape very quickly. You should definitely separate the 2 frogs, is the 2nd frog eating as well? The spot could be bacterial, viral or parasitic, you can try some antibiotics dropped directly on the spot to see if that helps. Again if the frog is eating small meals several times per day, you don't want to add stress by dumping a bunch of flies and have them crawl all over it. Observe the frog, give it lots of cover but do not mess with it other than misting feeding and possibly medicating it.
If it is not eating and gets much thinner and or the white spot grows or becomes ulcerated you may want to consider euthanizing it.
 
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