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Hey All,

My BioActive setup has been going for about 1 1/2 months now. This white ball mold just visually started up a couple days back. We do have ISO and springtails, however I have never seen them. The mold is starting to come to the top layer as seen in one of the pics. I am worried that I will have to redo the setup? I am going to air out the cage by keeping the doors open while the crestie sleeps. What should I do, is this serious enough to take action or will it correct itself over time? Do I need to get more springtails to combat this?
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I have this in my mourning gecko viv, too, but I've never seen it in any of my frog vivs.

It has been in there for some months. I don't worry about it.
 

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I've seen pictures of this on facebook the last few months. It seems to be much harder to get rid of then regular mold (that springtails just eat). Some folks reported getting rid of it by drying out the tank a bit more then usual. Not everyone is successful with this but its the only thing I've seen that suggests it might work.
 

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I've seen pictures of this on facebook the last few months. It seems to be much harder to get rid of then regular mold (that springtails just eat). Some folks reported getting rid of it by drying out the tank a bit more then usual. Not everyone is successful with this but its the only thing I've seen that suggests it might work.
Thanks for that info.
Can you point me to some of those posts that you've seen? Or what Facebook pages you follow so I can look it up?
 

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This will likely prove to be a controversial suggestion but persistant outbreaks of a specific species of mould or bacteria like this are in my opinion often the result of a lack of competition between the dramatically reduced diversity of microoogranisms in our tank susbtrates that is not necessarily healthy. Incorporating some healthy 'living' soil or worm castings into your substrate seems to reduce the incidence of this kind of outbreak in my experience but the introduction of non sterile natural material into your viviarium is often frowned upon here.
I believe some of the reasons given are quite legitimate and you do need to be extremely careful not to indroduce material that is likely to have come into contact with other native reptiles or amphibians to avoid the introduction of diseases for which your animals may possess no immunity but, anecdotally, I observe this kind of runaway outbreak far less in systems where I have included a little unsterilised leaf mould, worm castings, or well rotted wood.
Like yourself OP, I keep geckos rather than dart frogs.
 

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Thanks for that info.
Can you point me to some of those posts that you've seen? Or what Facebook pages you follow so I can look it up?
Finding stuff on Facebook.. not always easy. But if you make a post on poison dart froggers group you should get some responses.
 

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Loius makes a good point. Soil ecology is somewhat complicated and involves many different organisms for optimal plant health. (just look at hydroponics forums! The amount of information is staggering.)

If you're concerned about cleanliness of earthworm castings, there are also products like Orca Liquid Mycorhizae that can shift the balance in favor of positive microbes. It's not cheap though (I have some left over from treating my garden with it). But there are a wide range of basically plant probiotics that could be very beneficial to include in an environment where substrates have all largely been sterilized.

If you're curious for more details and information, research bioactive hydroponics and beneficial microbes for soil (also a lot of info related to compost teas). I'm a bit of a newbie on all that too but it's fascinating!
 

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Greetings,

That looks like it could be the mycelia of "yellow houseplant mushroom" Leucocoprinus birnbaumii. It is common in all kinds of plant substrates and will boom where there is compost-y substrate to digest. It tends to thrive in warm and dry (for a fungus) conditions so you might want keep your substrate a little wetter for while. Either way, it will likely recede in a few weeks or months. If you're lucky you'll get some bright yellow toadstools before you never see it again...
 
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