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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
-last night I put him in a plastic tub with a calcium-coated cricket for 20 min.
no progress

-wedged his mouth open with a very clean guitar pick and force-fed him cricket ... first time he's eaten in four days-
*progress ;)

-white-lipped tree frog is currently climbing glass walls of the cage while the white's tree frog stares at a metal bar through glass :confused:
*Progress? -well... it's good that the injured frog is moving around...

-I will go to pet store and vet place to get antibiotic ointment for his eye and infection today~ I will search untill I find it ... last resort= order it online for overnight delivery:p
_progressive__
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I just found some emegancy calcium deficiency liqued for amphibian/reptile from Scales n' Tales in my junk cabnet that I had used an a sick beardie, and was wondering if I should give my frog some so he doesn't wind up with red leg. Would you recommend this? Reply quick cause' my dad really wants to give this to him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
-I have orderd overnight shipment on terramycin opthalmic ointment
*progress:)

-I have now moved my injured white-lipped tree frog to a "hospital cage"
*progress:cool:

pictures are on "bacterial infection?" thread:D
 

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Erica, a few things, one, you should contact a moderator and ask that they combine both of your threads, it is easier to follow that way. Two, calcium will do nothing for Red Leg. Red leg is a descriptive term used to describe the appearance of symptoms of a very bad bacterial infection, which causes the cappillaries on the underside of the rear legs to leak and break down (bleed) , giving a red appearance to the legs, otherwise known as red leg. If you were able to go to a vet, the Baytril could be used to treat for that as well, that is why we strongly suggested going to a vet if possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well thank you- I had always thought my first frog had died of redleg... but aparently It was calcium deficiency and his legs were just pink...
 

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Well thank you- I had always thought my first frog had died of redleg... but aparently It was calcium deficiency and his legs were just pink...
The red coloration can also occur from irritation or even how the blood pools in the lower portion of the body after death. Red leg is at best a symptom and not a disease as there are a lot of things that can cause the lower portions of the frog's body to become red in color.

Ed
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
-I ordered an overnight shipment of the ointment yesterday but its 7:15 and I still haven't got it!:mad:
NO progress

-Willow (white-lipped) is currently a very nice color of green- that's a good sign; it was a muddy brown color when he first cut his eye and spazzed out.

-he has been resting now for about 25 hours (expected) his color pleases me and he seems to be less stressed.
*progress:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
-ointment was applied on Willow at 7:10, 1:00, and 4:27... he knew it was coming and tried to hide:)
*progress

-I changed his paper towels and cleaned out his water bowl (he likes to sit on the edge of it, with his but in the water:D) but I found no fecies-- he hasn't been eating so I will force feed him again tonight:(
*Progress

P.S. there is a calcium tablet in his water so its even better that he sits in it:D

P.S.S. I had a hard time putting him back in his cage after aplying the ointment because he kept climing out again before I could grab the lid... ... well ... it's an improvement*:rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Yes
he's a fighter, if he wasn't he wouldn't of held on so long... ....I always used to think of him as skitish, scared and a spazz because he never was comfertable with me holding him like his white's buddy, Evergreen. But he is not a white's tree frog, and he is my first white-lipped, so of coarse he's going to be different. I think this is a learning experience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
- at 7:09, 12:00, and 4:31 ointment was applied on his eye and nose

-forcefed him again yesterday... very hard- it's sad because he doesn't like it so much, and he is put in a situation where I have to ...
progress...
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
-he was given ointment at 7:07 and 3:27

- my mother found him under his hide today, and did not want to disturb his resting for something he dislikes so much (thats why there was no imbetween time)
 

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Nice to hear things are going well! Keep up the good work!

I'm not sure how well it would work for frogs, but they have small syringes (w/o a needle!) at the drug store that you use to give medicine to babies - maybe if he's having a hard time eating you could mush up a cricket and feed it to him through the syringe. This way you might not have to force his mouth open very far.



Maybe something like this?
 

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There are actually better equipment out there for force feeding see for example the selection here Health Care - The Bean Farm

Instead of mashing up a cricket or two, if you are going to tube the frog, I would suggest using a liquid feline diet like feline clinicare. See for example CliniCare Canine/Feline Liquid Diet Veterinary Information from Drugs.com When using clinicare, the excess can be portioned out into an ice cube tray and frozen with one of the cubes thawed as needed (as it goes bad quickly).

Ed
 
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