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Over the years of being in the hobby it seems several pumilio are becoming harder and harder to find. Here is my list and feel free to correct me if Im wrong.


"Cayo de Aquas"
"Solarte/ "Cayo Nancy"
"Loma Partida"
"Colons"
"Isla popa"

Please feel free to correct me if Im wrong or add any that I may have forgotten to the list. Again, this list is for pumilio that used to be common and now are hard to find!!! Not pumilio that have always been rare
 

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Somewhat joking. Many of the less common species are kept by those that have had them from the beginning. By are large, what changes are supply and demand. Look at bastis. Colons are actually much more widely available now then in the past. Its all boom and bust.

and yes, beware the hoarders.
 

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Hi Chris,

The truth is that the great majority of the vast numbers of O. pumilio that are imported each year end up dead (same with D. auratus). It "appears" that they are common because they are wild-collected in the thousands, but most people don't have the skills to care for them or breed them.

Wild-colllected animals have another ten layers of difficulty associated with them (including being able to deal with the great number of pathogens that they can carry).

Good breeders will always have an audience for their frog's progeny, because there just aren't that many people who are willing to become proficient enough to get O. pumilio to breed.

Just my opinion, Richard.
 

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I think the misnomer is that they were ever really common. For some reason people think that just because frogs start arriving in any sort of decent number, that they are then common or commonly available. Of the original imports of pumilio, how many died? Of that, how many made it into the hands of niche Dendrobatid hobbyists? Of that, how many made it into the hands of niche Dendrobatid hobbyists who didn't kill them or sell them a few months or a year later? Of that, how many of these folks have had regular success in breeding them and being able to offer F1 offspring? How many F2 pumilio do you see around? Given that...think about the numerous populations that have then come in, and the few number of people committed enough to try and hold onto them for a decent amount of time. That leaves VERY few folks working with any given population for any decent amount of time.
 

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I'm just getting started with pumilio. I think it was the cayo de agua that there was some disputes as far actual natural population or morph or something along those lines. Perhaps they've been relabeled? I don't want to pass along misinformation so def don't take it at face value. I just skimmed something like that a long time ago.
 

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Feel free to hook me up with some of those pumilio and I would be happy to make them more available in the hobby ;)

I think the misnomer is that they were ever really common. For some reason people think that just because frogs start arriving in any sort of decent number, that they are then common or commonly available. Of the original imports of pumilio, how many died? Of that, how many made it into the hands of niche Dendrobatid hobbyists? Of that, how many made it into the hands of niche Dendrobatid hobbyists who didn't kill them or sell them a few months or a year later? Of that, how many of these folks have had regular success in breeding them and being able to offer F1 offspring? How many F2 pumilio do you see around? Given that...think about the numerous populations that have then come in, and the few number of people committed enough to try and hold onto them for a decent amount of time. That leaves VERY few folks working with any given population for any decent amount of time.
......and even after all of that, there are plenty of hobbyists that don't mess with forums or don't actively sell in the classifieds.
 

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The hobby has made me a frog hoarder of sorts, and for good reasons.

Look at the newly arrived pumilio morphs and look at the average success people have with them in the first few months to a year. Most pairs reproduce like rabbits, especially cristobals and el dorados, and this is great but usually doesn't last long. If you only have one pair and don't hold back (hoard) some froglets what do you do when one or both of the adults dies? It's easy to replace if that morph is still coming in, but if that window is closed it's tough, IE rio branco, rio guaramo, uyamas, etc.

A long term success strategy is either acquire multiple pairs of frogs and or hold back enough to establish multiple pairs, hopefully trading ones own offspring with another hobbyist to increase genetic variability. This method allows replacement of lost frogs to keep the morph going in house and throughout the hobby.

Just some perspective
Eric
 

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I haven't been in this hobby too long, but it sure seems female Escudos are EXTREMELY scarce.. I know when I was first getting started Escudos were semi common.. now when I need some, I can't find a single one. Once I can get my hands on two and they breed, there's no way I'm selling any of the babies until they have some of their own. Same goes with true Blue Jeans, they're just as rare if not even more.

I blame hoarders as well, but it only makes me want to do the same..
 

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I actually think that blue jeans pumilio have become more common, or at least more readily available. For a while, the only person I knew that had them was Brent Brock, but within the last year, whether through the EU imports or breeders just releasing babies to the hobby, I have seen a lot more for sale on the forums here and a lot more people working with them.
It's funny you mention all of those morphs becoming hard to find because I had recently been thinking of looking to acquire some of those that you listed, seeing as they are becoming less common it appears. I remember when I saw lots of threads about people receiving groups of nice adult pumilio from SNDF, which maybe would make them seem more common, but aside from the trade/selling extras from those imports, I didn't see a lot of offspring for sale.
I would guess some of it is hoarding, which I also plan on doing with my mancreek juvis I am growing out until I get a "back-up" pair, but I also think some of those on your list might not have been as attractive to many people. Things like loma partida, popas, even cayo de aquas are all really neat in my opinion, but may not be appreciated as much to some as something like a cristobal or el dorado since they blend in more than others that really "pop".
I also think rio guaramo could be added to the list. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I remember them being sold all over on Kingsnake, etc. kind of like el dorados and almirantes are now, but (except for the recent thread on them on here) they seem to have disappeared and I have hardly seen anything on them lately.
Best of luck to anyone working with these less common pumilio, hopefully they are out there but just held back and aren't in real danger of being lost from the hobby.
Bryan
 

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I remember a few years back, that there were lots of Chiriqui River Pums available and I haven't seen any in a long while. I loved the shiny, metalic green.
I took a couple of years off from the forum so maybe they have been renamed to something else now? Do people still have these?
 
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