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I recieved 4 cultures last week from a dealer I found here on DendroBoard that was highly recomemded and they don't seem to be developing. :? I ran out of FF but see the larve moving around. It seems like they can't get past the larval stage. What is this I see all over the sides of the cup?

They seem to be dried up.

Some of the FF I used to start new cultures, so hopefully they will work. In the mean time I am goung to pet stores and buying FF cultures and pinheads. I do have springtails that are going great. :)

Here is the recipe I used to start the new cultures:

6c potato flakes
1c powdered sugar
1/2c brewers yeast

50/50 mix of water and white vinegar as the liquid. I used 1/4c of medium and 1/3c of liquid, mix well and add 3-4 grains of bakers yeast and let sit until the medium sets up. Add flies.

I also tried this recipe:

In a pot bring the following to a boil.
2 cups water
2 cups vinegar
1/8th cup Dark molasses
1/2 can of grape juice concentrate
2-3 overripe mushed up bananas
After bringing this mixture to a boil, add the dry material
1/2 cup malt of meal
2/3 cup potato flakes
1/3 cup Brewers Yeast (the key ingredient)
Place about 2 inches of medium in each qt size jar, and sprinkle maybe an 1/8th teaspoon of activated yeast on the top. A day later, 20-30 flies are added. For the first 10 days, keep the cultures in cardboard boxes which are kept closed, after that, keep them on a large shelf to help the larvae dry out.

We will see how it works! I am new to the hobby and have never raised FF before, what's up! :? I am spending more on food for my 5 Auratus than myself. :) Do the FF need anything special (Temp., Humidity., Time). Please help!
 

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Sounds like you are doing everything right. Just remember not to use all of the ff's in the culture. You need some to lay eggs for the next generation. The things on the side of the container are the fruit fly pupae. They will hatch into the adult flys. Hope this helps.
 

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I think the stuff on the sides of the cup that you mentioned are pupae, the larvae squigle up out of the medium when they are ready to go into their next stage, form these pods, then later hatch out. What may be happening with your cultures is during shipping, the pupae might have died, while the freshly laid eggs, and the adult flies have survived.
Another thing that might have happened (now that I think of it, this is more likely the case) is the flies you ordered were freshly set up, perhaps the vendor set them up, and sent them out as soon as there were visible larvae, with the flies that you used up being the flies they put in there to breed. If this is the case, which it probably is, you probably will have a good hatch of flies in a few days.
FYI: you can feed the larvae too, if you feel like picking them out!
I thought I'd seen a post here where a person would put a culture on top of a heat mat, which would drive the larvae up the sides of the cup to try and get away from the heat. The frogkeeper would then scrape them off with a spoon. Just remember this probably ends up being detrimental to fly production, but it's food now! Also If you have hydei, they become sterile in too warm of temps. (somewhere in the 80's I belive)
Take care,
 

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it is not a good idea to feed fly maggots to frogs. the maggots can be swallowed whole, and still alive. they may then damange the internal organs of the frog. similarly they do not have the same nutritional content as adult flies.
 
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NCSUdart said:
it is not a good idea to feed fly maggots to frogs. the maggots can be swallowed whole, and still alive. they may then damange the internal organs of the frog. similarly they do not have the same nutritional content as adult flies.
There has been speculation that Musca (house fly) larva can remain alive once eaten and damage the digestive system in some animals. I'm not sure how accurate this is and haven't tried it. However, this isn't really a concern when feeding Drosophila maggots due to the nature of the organism. But, do keep in mind that regular feeding with Drosophila larva can lead to obesity.

Derek
 
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