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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking for a viny terrestrial of some kind that is tolerant of non-organic matter, if such a thing even exists. This is the setting I'm trying to get it grow up, although it's not a perfectly up-to-date photograph:



^If you note the two castle pieces on the bottom, those are what I'm trying to get a vine to grow up against. I'm hoping for something that will sort of "conform" to the epoxy-clay surface it's growing against, so that it really looks like it's growing up a brick wall, as vines do in real life.

If it helps at all, the mortar lines for the bricks were made with a dime's edge, and are somewhat rough because of that. Also, the area in which that vine would be planted gets about 75% humidity, and they see what I would more or less call moderate light. Substrate moisture is fairly high. (Also, this is not an inhabited vivarium, just a regular old terrarium.)

I know that these are a lot of conditions to satisfy, so that I don't expect many different terrarium-suitable plants to satisfy them. Thanks for your consideration.
 

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Is this epoxy mixed with clay or a clay covered in epoxy? Clay will hold moss just fine. Curious did you build it? You may be able to get away with gluing on some attachment points to allow the vine to hold. Something like a small hardwood L or U hook. Otherwise it will be pretty challenging for any tendrils to attach to epoxy from my experience. You may even try gluing some small pieces of window screen in a spiral pattern. That would give hold for some plants. May try Ficus pumula or Hedera Helix. Even a chance you could just superglue them to the spires without damaging the plant too much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Is this epoxy mixed with clay or a clay covered in epoxy? Clay will hold moss just fine. Curious did you build it? You may be able to get away with gluing on some attachment points to allow the vine to hold. Something like a small hardwood L or U hook. Otherwise it will be pretty challenging for any tendrils to attach to epoxy from my experience. You may even try gluing some small pieces of window screen in a spiral pattern. That would give hold for some plants. May try Ficus pumula or Hedera Helix. Even a chance you could just superglue them to the spires without damaging the plant too much.
Very good information. Although I more or less found the answer(s) to my question, I value highly any intel I can get.

Some responses:

Is this epoxy mixed with clay or a clay covered in epoxy? Clay will hold moss just fine. Curious did you build it?
No, the epoxy itself has a clay-like texture. The whole thing is epoxy. It's not an earthen clay like air-dry. It's more like polymer clay.

I don't want to speak too much about it because I don't know that much about it, but it's a synthetic material that cures with the feel of a very hard plastic. It is naturally quite smooth, more so that something like cork bark or unsanded wood. It's not something I'd expect most plants to like to root into.

You may be able to get away with gluing on some attachment points to allow the vine to hold. Something like a small hardwood L or U hook.
That's a neat idea, if it wouldn't clash with the look of a castle. If plants can root or latch onto it, that would be cool.

Mostly, though, I was looking for something that would look like it naturally grew along the surface of the castle.

You may even try gluing some small pieces of window screen in a spiral pattern. That would give hold for some plants.
This may become too visible for my purpose (If I'm understanding it correctly), but it is a good idea, and I will store it for future use.

Even a chance you could just superglue them to the spires without damaging the plant too much.
This is the likeliest to be useful in this specific situation. If I can find some super glue that is not damage by water, that attaches pretty well to epoxy clay, that will be a boon. Or I could use an epoxy adhesive in a caulk tube, something that comes out in a small bead.

May try Ficus pumula or Hedera Helix.
Does Hedera Helix survive well in high humidity? I assumed for one reason or another that as a houseplant it wouldn't like super-high humidity. I would love to use it in a terrarium eventually, if it can survive.

I don't know if the Ficus is what I'm looking for. I'm basically looking for what some Marcgravia have and do: wide, flat leaves that adhere to the sides of the surface they're growing against.

I have a Begonia Foliosa that may end up doing the same thing, but I don't know enough about the plant (I haven't seen it fully grown yet) to know if it will work. I don't have a photograph of it on this computer, I'm afraid.
 

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If I can find some super glue that is not damage by water, that attaches pretty well to epoxy clay, that will be a boon.
Water is no problem. Reefers use cyanoacrylate gel to affix pieces of live rock to larger dead rocks.

I'm not sure how well the glue will stick to your material. I have used it to affix orchids to textured, dry-pigmented epoxy backgrounds. Those orchids are still there, years later. They've grabbed hold with roots and stuff, but for all i can tell the glue joints are still sound. No visible cracks anyway. Oh yeah - in the growing season anyway, those tanks are quite moist. Well-ventilated, but quite moist. I do allow some drying in winter - the orchids need it.

Does Hedera Helix survive well in high humidity?
Yes, but what kills it is a lack of a winter break. It's a temperate plant and needs a dormant spell. Keeping it "wide awake and working hard" all year will kill it. Apparently, that is the only thing that will...I suspect you don't need to do too-too much in that regard, just dial back the heat and watering, and shorten the daylength. Your other plants - even equatorial ones - would probably appreciate it too. Hardly anything lives exactly the same all year round, in nature.

cheers
 
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