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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't have a picture for it, but I can describe it: It's a device that curves the flow of water downward so that the water being pumped straight up by the pump drops downward. It's sort of like how a faucet head directs water straight down even thought it was going upwards originally.

I'm planning to work with this piece of driftwood:



You can kind of see the fiber of the wood curving downwards. When I tested it with a water hose, the water followed the fibers and made several very attractive little waterfalls. However, it only works if the water descends straight down.

I'm planning on making this driftwood spire the rock upon which an elaborate model castle rests itself. So the device I'm asking about in this thread would be masked by a castle turret spanning across two of the "peaks".

I also wanted to ask about the viability of a herp living in the kind of setting I described in the paragraphs above. This model setting is not necessarily going to house an animal, and probably won't house any living thing at all, but I did want to make sure there were no glaring threats to life as far as anyone knows. I did pressure wash the driftwood clean a while ago, and I may wash it again. The wood itself seems to be cypress (I live in New Orleans near the Mississippi River), although if anyone can tell me whether or not that's true, they are welcome.
 

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A trick we used to use was to shape an appropriate sized rigid plastic tube (sold by the foot at fish stores). This was done by filling a piece of the tube that was cut to the length you need with gravel and putting a piece of tape over both sides. You can then heat the outside of the tube (with heat gun or lighter, etc.) where you want it bent and bend it in the direction(s) you want to. The gravel keeps the tube from pinching shut. This way, you can form it in whatever direction you need it to go. You can choose a size of rigid tubing that fits the flex tubing you will likely use to get from the pump to the top of the waterfall. So, you can make an "S" or a hook, or whatever fits and holds the tube in place where it needs to stay for the waterfall.

Good luck!

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Encyclia: Thanks for the intel! I actually bought a heat gun a while ago with the intent of bending PVC pipes to serve as the frame for stump roots in a terrarium, but I never ended up using it. This sounds like a fine idea.

Socratic Monologue: Thanks! I'll probably use something like that. That one may be a bit too tall considering the kind of structure I'm going to be hiding it in.

thedudeabides: Thanks! I'll use something similar, since that one has a valve that would get in the way.

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Actually, as I was typing out this response, it occurred to me that I probably don't want the water source descending straight down, like a faucet; it wouldn't look natural.

What would probably both look more like a waterfall and be more space efficient is if I took something like Socratic Monologue's link's item, cut it in half, and had the water flow out sideways (by which I mean, in the same direction a fire hydrant shoots out water). The water would hit the interior of the castle walls (which are going to conceal the pipe) and drop straight down in a broader line that looks more like a waterfall. I'd have to coat the interior of the wood in Flexseal or something like it, though, in order that it doesn't rot over time.

If what I'm describing makes sense, feel free to comment on it or point out what will or won't work.
 
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