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When after you mist do you have a million little mushrooms pop up and die within about 24 hours? If so you could have a fungus similar to one that I have in one of my tanks, but mine is a bit more orange. I think the only true way to get rid of it is to redo the whole tank or just wait until its food source has depleted.

If its the same type that I have, springs will do no good. They just slow it down a little.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have not seen any mushrooms. I is just like a furry mold on the sides of the clay wall.
 

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How long has your viv been set up? Have you tried misting it to knock it back a bit?
 

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It looks like the mold is originating from your background (I'm assuming it is clay). If so, what did you mix with the clay? That would most likely be the cause of what is happening. If you want to reduce mold, add lots of microfauna, increase air circulation, slighly reduce humididy and overall waterings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I has beens set up for like 9 months. I have sprayed it with water and it had no effect. I wiped it all off a few months ago and it came back, but i think ill just keep doing that. I have springs in there and ill add a tom more. The background is clay with peat and coconut mixed in.
 

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Ive seen this on multiple clay backgrounds, even pure clay with no additives. Put a bunch of springs in there and see if they eat it. It seems to just be a fungi imperfecti, as I dont know anyone whose gotten fruiting from it.
 

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It seems better airflow would nearly stop the spread of that stuff. I think everyone gets that from time to time. I had it until I put more ventilation holes in my viv and a fan on it intermittently. Works wonders. The springs don't seem to be able to really stem the growth too much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Is there any danger for my pair of thumbs from this crap.
 

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Is there any danger for my pair of thumbs from this crap.
Only because of poor ventilation, if that is the case. Living in air dense with spores 24/7 may take a toll on their well-being. If upon opening the viv you find it smells strongly of mold instead of clean earth, get more ventilation.

Otherwise it doesn't seem to affect them. It would not grow on them unless they were in very poor health and had a sore on their body that did not heal up, and even if that were to happen it is treatable with medication. That's a pretty rare occurrence in general.

Sometimes you will see mycoses on frogs in the form of mushy, brown lesions, but this is from their living in very poor conditions (dirty, soaked substrate that hasn't been changed every year, tanks that are never wiped or rinsed of fecal material, etc.)
 

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I am pretty sure these are fungal hyphae, the mass of mushroom that usualy grows underground. As mushrooms are a great food source for many soil microfauna (including springtails and isopods), I would view the hyphae as a positive occurence. I don't think there is much chance of a frog being caught in this.

Take care, Richard.
 

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I am pretty sure these are fungal hyphae, the mass of mushroom that usualy grows underground. As mushrooms are a great food source for many soil microfauna (including springtails and isopods), I would view the hyphae as a positive occurence. I don't think there is much chance of a frog being caught in this.

Take care, Richard.
Is it possible it could be saprolegnia fungi? That's what I was thinking. It seems to originate behind the space where the brom is fitted into the plastic tubing.

Either way the extra ventilation is still a good idea.
 
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