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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do most people use open front shadow boxes, small containers(with lid-petri dish, etc), or some other method? I have a VERY small target and a "Cannon Rebel EOS" camera. What is the best way to capture a great pic, and also ensure the frog does not hit the floor(working alone..)? Thanks so much!

JBear
 

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Are these pictures to sell frogs or to just show off what you have?

Personally I wouldn't take a frog out of their enclosure unless they were moving to a new home. I open the doors and learn to work with the lighting/conditions that I have in the viv. Flash only if necessary. I love taking pictures and would be freaking the frogs out regularly if I removed them each time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Are these pictures to sell frogs or to just show off what you have?

Personally I wouldn't take a frog out of their enclosure unless they were moving to a new home. I open the doors and learn to work with the lighting/conditions that I have in the viv. Flash only if necessary. I love taking pictures and would be freaking the frogs out regularly if I removed them each time.
This frog is moving to a new viv from a rearing "cup". I just wanted to know the best way to show the frog in full clarity. The frog is not for sale, it is merely to show a young froglet of amazingly diminutive size! Thanks!

JBear
 

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What kind of camera gear are you working with? Which model of Rebel is it? What lenses?

The nice thing about frogs is that they don't move around a lot so you can use slower shutter speeds. You can achieve pretty good results with just natural light inside their vivarium as long as you have a tripod and your camera has a timer feature.
 

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Are these pictures to sell frogs or to just show off what you have?

Personally I wouldn't take a frog out of their enclosure unless they were moving to a new home. I open the doors and learn to work with the lighting/conditions that I have in the viv. Flash only if necessary. I love taking pictures and would be freaking the frogs out regularly if I removed them each time.
What do you mean "when necessary"? The reason I ask is because I was wondering as to weather or not the flash could damage the frogs eyes. I am just wondering if it could potentially be dangerous in what situation could it ever possibly be necessary to use it? New to the frogs and don't know the best way to snap a few pics of them, been going without the flash thus far. What I am really looking for here is a definitive answer of weather or not it could potentially be damaging as I don't want to hinder their ability to find food.
 

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I am not sure if a flash could damage the frogs eyes or not, I am just concerned that it could increase stress. All I was saying is that I would choose a larger aperture and a slower shutter speed before I decided to use a flash.
 

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I think there was a paper about owls and flash photography... basically said that there is no damage to their eyes or vision. Think about lightning storms and how bright those flashes can be.

The one danger could come from the proximity of the frog to the flash tube(s). Depending on which model flash and what power setting you have it set to, you could actually burn the frog. When I worked at a camera store we succeeded in setting fire to paper by triggering flash units in close proximity to the paper - seriously. I've also accidentally put a permanent burn into a vinyl couch with a regular, hot shoe flash.
 
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