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I happened to see what appeared to be eggs down in the substrate. What are they?

Also kind of a random thought but I'm under the impression that we shouldn't handle these little azureus. It's kind of odd but when when I opened the door to mist, one of them comes right up to the door. Got this weird feeling like he was looking for attention. That normal?

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I happened to see what appeared to be eggs down in the substrate. What are they?

Also kind of a random thought but I'm under the impression that we shouldn't handle these little azureus. It's kind of odd but when when I opened the door to mist, one of them comes right up to the door. Got this weird feeling like he was looking for attention. That normal?
Kind of a blurry pic but looks like fungus and or mold. Nothing to worry about. It's pretty normal in a newly set up tank.

I don't handle my frogs ever, unless one hops out of the tank during maintenance/feeding and even then it is for the briefest of moments. I don't advise you to do so either. No reason to ever. It just stresses out the frog and risks bodily harm.

As for them coming out to greet you, I've experienced the same. Many begin to associate the opening of the cage door with feeding time. A dinner bell if you will. They are not coming out to seek affection or give you love. They want to eat.
 

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I recently had these little dots in my Viv as well. I think they are a fungus or slime mold. It was actually right next to one of my rabbits foot fern rhizomes, literally mounted against it, and it didn’t cause any harm to the plant so I assume it’s benign.
 

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Frequent occurrence:


As an aside, that sphagnum layer is not something that most keepers here would recommend. It holds too much moisture (it is possibly keeping water from reaching your ABG, and so encouraging the fungal growth) and so it rots leaf litter and plant stems, and isn't really useful to the frogs.
 
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Kind of a blurry pic but looks like fungus and or mold. Nothing to worry about. It's pretty normal in a newly set up tank.

I don't handle my frogs ever, unless one hops out of the tank during maintenance/feeding and even then it is for the briefest of moments. I don't advise you to do so either. No reason to ever. It just stresses out the frog and risks bodily harm.

As for them coming out to greet you, I've experienced the same. Many begin to associate the opening of the cage door with feeding time. A dinner bell if you will. They are not coming out to seek affection or give you love. They want to eat.
Ah okay. Shows how new I am. I thought they were eggs. Haha.

I wasn't really thinking affection or love. Just attention. Last time I fed them today they freaked out a bit.
 

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Frequent occurrence:


As an aside, that sphagnum layer is not something that most keepers here would recommend. It holds too much moisture (it is possibly keeping water from reaching your ABG, and so encouraging the fungal growth) and so it rots leaf litter and plant stems, and isn't really useful to the frogs.
Oh that'd be cool to get the bright yellow mushrooms.

Thanks for pointing it out. I've seen sphagnum used a lot. Is it based off older information?
 

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lot. Is it based off older information?
Oh that'd be cool to get the bright yellow mushrooms.

Thanks for pointing it out. I've seen sphagnum used a lot. Is it based off older information?
Sphagnum can be used as a small amendment to your substrate for it's moisture retention capabilities, but definitely should not be used as the entire substrate, or as a substitute for leaf litter. As Socratic said above, it can actually cause harm. Dart frog feet that are constantly wet can literally rot off. When I first started out in the hobby, I thought we wanted a wet environment for our frogs. Turns out they like a lot less wet and lower humidity than I ever thought. Thankfully I never had any issues with my frogs, but rotted many a plant away before I learned.
 

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Sphagnum can be used as a small amendment to your substrate for it's moisture retention capabilities, but definitely should not be used as the entire substrate, or as a substitute for leaf litter. As Socratic said above, it can actually cause harm. Dart frog feet that are constantly wet can literally rot off. When I first started out in the hobby, I thought we wanted a wet environment for our frogs. Turns out they like a lot less wet and lower humidity than I ever thought. Thankfully I never had any issues with my frogs, but rotted many a plant away before I learned.
Hmm, I kind of confused now. You mentioned that your plants were rotting, however my plants are all thriving. So the environment with the sphagnum moss must not have hit that level yet, right? The data sheet for humidity said to keep it above 80%.

Would I be better off removing the sphagnum moss or adding more leaf litter?
 

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Hmm, I kind of confused now. You mentioned that your plants were rotting, however my plants are all thriving. So the environment with the sphagnum moss must not have hit that level yet, right? The data sheet for humidity said to keep it above 80%.

Would I be better off removing the sphagnum moss or adding more leaf litter?
Plants will develop problems if they are kept too wet. I was guilty of that a lot in the beginning. Some are more susceptible than others so you may have plants that are a little tougher in that environment, or as you say have not hit that level of saturation yet.

Humidity in your tanks will fluctuate throughout the day based on your misting schedule, ventilation, and exterior conditions. There will be times it is 100% and times where it will dip well below 80%. The important thing is to allow your plants and surfaces in your tank to dry some between misting. Getting the right balance between misting and humidity and drying out will require some experimentation.

You would absolutely be better off removing the sphagnum and adding more leaf litter. You really can't have enough ever. The leaf litter dries out faster and traps moisture below, creating a multitude of microclimates for your frogs and the microfauna living within. Sphagnum doesn't allow this.
 

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Plants will develop problems if they are kept too wet. I was guilty of that a lot in the beginning. Some are more susceptible than others so you may have plants that are a little tougher in that environment, or as you say have not hit that level of saturation yet.

Humidity in your tanks will fluctuate throughout the day based on your misting schedule, ventilation, and exterior conditions. There will be times it is 100% and times where it will dip well below 80%. The important thing is to allow your plants and surfaces in your tank to dry some between misting. Getting the right balance between misting and humidity and drying out will require some experimentation.

You would absolutely be better off removing the sphagnum and adding more leaf litter. You really can't have enough ever. The leaf litter dries out faster and traps moisture below, creating a multitude of microclimates for your frogs and the microfauna living within. Sphagnum doesn't allow this.
Sometimes there are still wet spots on the leaves of the live plants but the hardscape drys out pretty well.

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