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Definately not auratus, but I wouldn't say for sure what sips they are, tho they do look like blues. That would be something you'd ask the peopel you got them from... but they obviously didn't have a clue!

These guys are also underweight to start feeding them like crazy and fatten them up!
 
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They are blue sips. They will lighten up over the next few months and appear whiteish with a blue hue on them around 10 months or so. Everyone has told you to beef them up, so try some fruit fly (especially D. hydei) maggots to do that as well. Make a culture a bit too wet and the maggots will leave the medium, then just scrape them off the side of the container and put them in a dish.
j
 

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Again with tincs..also sipaliwini area is difficult. The only good info we have about that area is the 'True Sipaliwini' morph.
Young animals are developing another pattern if they are getting older.
So if the are a little bit older you must see the difference and you will know if Justin won the Microweaver or i did :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks

Thanks for the help guys. I've been feeding them alot and they're looking alot better. I've been trying ff larva as suggested with no problems. Does anyone know of any good herp vets in the upstate ny region?

Thanks again,

Jeff
 

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Whoa! Ease up on the fatten them fast advice. Yes, these frogs are obviously dangerously under weight but fattening them up too fast can be lethal. Ed Kowalski knows a lot about this and hopefully he won't mind my quoting an unpublished article he wrote:

From Ed Kowalski - "The first reaction when encountering a thin animal is to feed it to satiation upon a calorically dense food item such as waxworms in an attempt to restore the animal to a better weight. Depending upon how far the starvation has progressed this tactic could potentially cause the death of the animal through refeeding syndrome. Refeeding syndrome occurs when the condition of the animal is so poor that blood concentrations are maintained within normal ranges by lessening the levels of electrolytes within the cells. A sudden influx of food items can cause a loss of the electrolytes in the bloodstream as the electrolytes are used to assist the transport of nutrients into the cells. This sudden loss of electrolytes after feeding can result in rapid death of the animal and could be an explanation for the sudden deaths of newly imported animals that are thin. To avoid these complications small meals fed daily can help to improve the condition of the animal. After a period of time of the smaller meals the quantity of the food can be increased slowly. Once the amount of food approximates a normal meal than depending upon the species in question, the frequency of the meal can be decreased to approximate, the normal husbandry applied to the species in question."

And whoever sold these frogs should be flogged.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Brent, I've been trying to do just that. I've been trying several slightly larger and more frequent feedings as what I had been doing before. I had been feeding daily, but unfortunately did not realize the amount was insufficient. I realize that this change has to be done over an extended period of time and that feeding too much can result in injury/death of the animal. Thanks for the advice, I appreciate everyone's... as a beginner in this hobby I'm still trying to learn and absorb as much information as I can in order to provide the best possible care and husbandry of these animals.

Jeff
 
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