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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Vriesea Erythrodactylon in my tank for which I can't decide if it's showing signs of scorching or simply acclimating to its new conditions.

I'm currently running the lights in my tank significantly higher than what they would normally be as there are no frogs in the tank yet and I want to promote plant growth. The Vriesea Erythrodactylon at the top of my tank is receiving between 400-450 PPFD as measured on Photone's PAR meter (I intend to reduce the brightness to be about 80% of what it is currently when the I introduce the frogs if not lower depending on their behavior).

I've read that Vriesea tend to do fine at higher light levels, but one particular plant at the very top of the tank appears to potentially be displaying signs of scorching. Two of its oldest leaves has already turned brown in the ten days that it's been in the tank and a fair few are showing yellowing around their edges. It is worth noting that the other Erythrodactylons that I have in the tank don't seem to be displaying any significant signs of scorching and they're only slightly further away from the light, a few inches, than the plant in question. Also, the afflicted plant's pup don't appear to be showing any signs of scorching either (I don't know how relevant this is).
Leaf Terrestrial plant Grass family Flowering plant Wood
Terrestrial plant Plant Grass Flowering plant Art

Leaf Terrestrial plant Bird Natural material Grass


Leaf Terrestrial plant Plant Flowering plant Grass


The reason why I haven't reduced the brightness quite yet is because I've only introduced the plant about 10 days ago after 10% bleach dip for 10 minutes so the plant's poor condition could also be due stress from acclimation and the bleach dip (I've heard bromeliads don't tend to take those too well).

I'm currently misting twice a day once in the morning (1 minute) and once in the late afternoons (30 seconds), making sure that all the leaves are dried within a reasonable amount of time and the bromeliad's cups have water within them. I've been running things slightly wetter with less ventilation to allow the newly introduced plants to root while losing a minimal amount of leaves. That is not to say that I have no ventilation at all. I have approximately 5 inches of vents which I intend to increase to 8 when the frogs are in the tank. For an idea of how damp things currently are in the enclosure, I've included images of the leaf litter approximately 6 hours after the last misting. The images show that while there are some puddle areas/ wetter areas (microclimates), the leaf litter is largely dried. The white specks are the springtails which I've dumped in there.

Brown Organism Terrestrial plant Plant Wood

Brown Plant Wood Terrestrial plant Tints and shades

Plant Wood Organism Terrestrial plant Bedrock


The lights are on for 14 hours a day to promote growth. This will be reduced to 13 hours once the frogs are introduced.

Note: I understand that R. Fantasticas are not facultative egg feeders, but I've elected to add the vriesea anyways because I don't intend to breed them. If I do change my mind I can always remove them later. The frogs I will be receiving are also quite young regardless (1-2 months OOW) so I'll have time to decide and I think it's better to give them more places to hide while the tank grows-in in the form of these vriesea).

Any help is greatly appreciated, thank you.
 

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This post has been sitting quiet for a bit, so I’ll chime in.

Honestly, I think you have nothing to worry about. I think you’re just seeing a little bit of acclimation.

Sometimes things can look pretty rough before they start to thrive. I’ve got a few newly planted specimens that are barely hangin’ in there. I’d be happy if my plants looked as good as yours!
 

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As @solidsnake has said, this looks like acclimation to me. Most Vrisea in my experience are grown for the houseplant industry so are grown in a very different environment in comparison to your tank.

Every plant will go through an acclimation process as it placed in a new environment, some are quick to get on with things while others take their time. There are lots of new variables to contend with, such as new levels of humidity, airflow, lighting, temperatures, microbes, media, predation.

I would hazard a guess and say your Vrisea may look worse before it looks any better, given their growth form.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Honestly, I think you have nothing to worry about. I think you’re just seeing a little bit of acclimation.
looks like acclimation to me
Thank you for your answers. I was just worried because I'd hate it if the lights I'd turned up to promote plant growth ended up being the factor that kills them.
 
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