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I wanted to see if anyone has used a tub to have a water feature inside a tank. Instead of having water running all throughout and making the substrate soggy when the water level gets too high. How can I make it look natural and transition onto the land
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I wanted to see if anyone has used a tub to have a water feature inside a tank. Instead of having water running all throughout and making the substrate soggy when the water level gets too high. How can I make it look natural and transition onto the land View attachment 300272 area?
In this case I have an odd sized short 10 gallon tank inside a 40 breeder sized exo terra
 

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Ive used a sink basin. For a large lizard enclosure.
 

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Having a water body separate makes it compatible with water hygiene control, in my experience.
 

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I think I understand the logic behind having your land portion held within the confines of the tub, but I'm not sure if it's a good idea. I assume you're wanting to do this to prevent your substrate from being saturated by the surrounding water? Or perhaps you don't want the substrate to be washed away?

My concerns would be the collection of water becoming stagnant from the watering your plants. This water will continue to collect, eventually water logging your substrate. You'll likely need to devise provisions to drain that water somehow.

Maybe i'm wrong? I'm sure other more experienced members will continue to offer opinions.
 

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You would just use a siphon that hooks up to a faucet.

Low profile tanks feel pretty fragile tho, the ones Ive handled.
 

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Sorry i am doing stuff when i go on here sometimes ..

The 'general' reason for a separated water body is for control. The water pool is not depending on a nitrogen cycle but is replaced.

Many situations have an influx of not just stool, but putrification of live foods or foods eaten in the water by animals like crabs, turtles that cause the water to foul in surpass of filtration or plants in the water.

Because of this they are regularly rinsed and given a scrub. In large aquatic portion zoo settings the water is drained and pressure hosed, there are even submersible scrub machines, kind of look like floor waxers, to deal with biofilm of these.

Lots of zoo husbandry stuff can be scaled down for hobby use.

I dont know why you are choosing a separate pool, but the reason I would, would be because I want a more rough and ready water situation for an actively messy animal, that i need to empty/scrub/up after.

I dont know if I would choose a thin walled glass for that. But then im superimposing what I want in a pool not knowing your plan.
 

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I tried this with my water feature at first. It was a miserable failure due to the fact that once the substrate, etc. are in place, the water goes wherever it wants. Wicking isn't only a vertical thing - it also goes to the side. I ended up breaking up the water box and just letting the water go throughout the drainage layer. That has worked long term, but the tank is still too wet for my liking. My experience could have had to do with poor implementation but even looking back, I can't think of anything I could have done to guarantee success.

I will state my usual caveat that water features and dart frogs are not usually a good combination (though my Ameerega are very tolerant of wetter conditions). OP, ignore this if you aren't doing dart frogs in this tank, but the advice still pertains to anyone else thinking about water features and dart frogs.

Mark
 

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I wanted to see if anyone has used a tub to have a water feature inside a tank.
Decades ago, when I was still messing around with keeping turtles and other aquatic or semiaquatic animals, this was my go-to approach. I typically used a pair of dish tubs - one to hold the substrate in place, the other nested inside the first so I could pull it out for water changes & rinses or washes.

How can I make it look natural and transition onto the land
Right. It's tough. You can build up the margin beyond the static tub, with foam coated in whatever. But you'll always have the tub itself.

There are other ways. Better ways, depending on your objective.

You haven't come back, so either you're busy as hell, or not that into this idea. Regardless, I'll ask - what is it you're trying to accomplish. There's a shit-ton of possible hows in the world. The shit-ton shrinks to just a little shit-pile though, once you define a crisp why.
 

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Why don’t you add a bulkhead to keep the water level at a certain level? So every time you mist the excess drains down to a reservoir.
 

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I wanted to see if anyone has used a tub to have a water feature inside a tank. Instead of having water running all throughout and making the substrate soggy when the water level gets too high. How can I make it look natural and transition onto the land View attachment 300272 area?
I tried this back in the 1980s and 1990s. It did not work well. Bulk head & false bottom drainage works best.
 
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