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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know exactly what species this is. I've had these for about 1,5 years now but still don't know what they are. I bought a group of these from a Hungarian guy at a German frogday. He told me they where E. pictus. But clearly they are not. They about one centimeter smaller that the Bolivian E. pictus I work with. they sound very different, look different, behave different.
Please don't bother giving suggestions like E. hahneli or A. femoralis if you don't know it for sure.

 
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The picture on the above mentioned website shows them much more washed out they are usually more your frogs color and the dorsal lines extend over their eyes like yours.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
These frogs are not Colosthetus inguinalis. They don't look like them either.
They really are an Epipedobates species. Anybody???

Remco
 

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unknown Epipe

Remco,

It definately is an Epipedobates. My first thought is femoralis, it has the body shape of that group and the general color scheme of femoralis. The frog pictured is too robust to be picuts/hahneli group which is the most closely resembling species.

Do you have any info on where it was collected? This may not help much as femoralis and pictus are found together in most countries north of the amazon. Femoralis have basal webbing on the toes which pictus lack.

The femoralis I keep are larger than any pictus/hahneli species that I've seen here in the US, they have a two pitched peep-peep call, not a trill as other Epipes.

Have your frogs started breeding or shown any courting behavior?

Hope this helps
Eric
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
they are deffinitly not E. bassleri or E. boulengeri. They boulengeri I keep are about half an inch while these are about 3/4 of an inch, they sound very different and look very different too.
I used to keep E. bassleri too and those are about 2 or 3 times larger, also sound very different and they don't have signal spots where these frogs have 3 pairs of signal spots.

Femoralis usually are very shy frogs where these are very bold and outgoing. They sounds kinda like E. pictus but alot shorter calls and lesser volume.

They are probably collected in Peru or Brazil (somewhere around the border), so I was told.

My frogs have laid many eggs for me, about 700 till this day and they just started laying again after having stopped for half a year. There's only one big problem which I also see in my E. pictus and sometimes in E. tricolor clutches. The eggs develope normally till after a week or 10 days the larva start to blow up like a balloon and pop. The clutches do seem to get I little better over time but still no viable larva.

Unfortunatly I don't have any better pics, but some can be found on a German website http://www.tropenfroesche.de

Greetings Remco
 

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Epipedobates boulengeri

If the first finger is longer than the second its probably E. boulengeri. They range in size from 15 to 21 mm so .075 inch is in that range.

Best,

Chuck[/i]
 

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Epipedobates boulengeri

If the first finger is longer than the second its probably E. boulengeri. They range in size from 15 to 21 mm so .075 inch is in that range.

Best,

Chuck[/i]
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
As you can see in my posts, I am familiar with E. boulengeri and it sure isn't that. My boulengeri are even smaller, lacking any flashmarks and produce a very different call.

Greetings Remco
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
It's white...

Greetings Remco
 
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This looks alot like Epipedobates cainarachi. Your image is pretty washed out making it difficult to compare the actual coloration. Here is a pic of an
E. cainarachi. Hope this helps.

-Bill J.

 
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I'm nearly positive it isn't... from what I remember they have more of a red back and definitely have gorgeous blue on the underside and some of the legs/sides. I don't know what it is, but something in the E. femoralis group certainly would make sense.
j
 
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