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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A short while back I acquired a couple cobalts from someone who was no longer able to take care of them. I have always found one of them to be 'different' looking...






I currently have 6 cobalts and I've never seen one that has a black line running across its face between its eyes and nose. I'm still fairy new to the hobby, but the only morph I can find that has that same look is the Trois Piton morph seen here Dendrobates tinctorius morphguide
(Color morph #31.)
I was curious if this is possibly some mixed species morph or if this in fact common...
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Maybe its a dumb question, but I also thought it'd be an easy one.
Anyone?
 

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I ask because I found out afterwards where this frog came from... and this local shop is known to have shotty husbandry and questionable ethics.
 

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Why is that? I mean breeding in the wild is what got us some of these morphs. You cod possibly create a new morph by breeding certain frogs. That is how they got the white ball python. Selective breeding. I'm just curios why it's not done with darts.
 

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*cough* SEARCH FUNCTION!! We do not want our hobby to end up like the ball python hobby.
Frogfever- your cobalt looks fine, but if you want to be 100%safe then just don't breed it. Get more cobalts from Darren instead and breed those
 

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Why is that? I mean breeding in the wild is what got us some of these morphs. You cod possibly create a new morph by breeding certain frogs. That is how they got the white ball python. Selective breeding. I'm just curios why it's not done with darts.
No, actually these morphs are unique in the wild and do not breed together to create all different new morphs. Frequently they are separated by geographic barriers so the two populations never come in contact with each other, such as islands, large rivers, and mountain ranges.
There can be a bit of variance within on specific population, so don't think just because the trois piton picture shows black in the face means that is a definite ID. I would also tend to think it's a cobalt due to the fact that they are very common, even in pet stores, and I haven't heard of anyone in the hobby with the "trois piton" locale.
Bryan
 

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Unfortunately, the name "Cobalt" has been used for frogs collected from several different localities. So there is already a "grab bag" of frogs that are called Cobalts in the hobby.

Phenotypically, the frog in your photos appear to be Cobalts. The reticulated blue legs without any white or yellow markings is pretty characteristic for the morph.

Good luck with then, Richard.
 
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