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Hoping someone can help me diagnose one of my orchids:

I just planted out a tank a few days ago, and one of the orchids (I think it's Stelis argentata) isn't doing so great.

I have it mounted in spagnhum, in a little planter in the corner. It has dropped a few leaves, and others are turning brown from their tips inward as the photo below shows.

I have good ventillation, and misters on a timer 3 times a day (RO water). I also tried mounting the orchids in the tank in a low-ish light locations.
295245


This photo gives some context, it's the orchid on the far right ( you can also see one of the dropped leaves).
295246
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It just has sphagnum moss wrapped around it's roots and was placed in a planter in the foam background. I don't think it's buried, it just has some cocofiber on the leaves that fell off the background.
 

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Probably too wet from the zombie moss and it looks like the crown is buried. Cloud forest orchids may like to stay moist but they don't like their roots soggy. The roots and crown need air. Plants like these grow on branches and twigs in the wild, where their roots wrap around, on top of the bark. I think you will have better success if you mount the orchid on the wood on either side of it. Put some live moss on the wood and put the orchid's roots on top of the moss and tie it down firmly but not tightly with fishing line. The roots should be kept moist enough by the live moss and will grab hold of the wood. Avoid using re-hydrated sphagnum (a.k.a. zombie moss) because as it breaks down it acidifies. Epiphytic orchids, which yours is, generally don't like low pH growing situations. These plants also don't receive large amounts of fertilizer from decaying plant matter, which is an other effect of the zombie moss breaking down.
 

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Hello,

All the orchids that I have, have needed some time to adapt to the new conditions of the terrarium. Observe it and give it time.

For now, don't worry about the falling leaves. If they are turning yellow from the tip in, it doesn't have to be a bad sign. (The bad thing is that they turn yellow from the base to the tip). Orchids have to throw out old leaves so that the new ones can grow, in the new conditions of the terrarium.

I have to say that Stellis are one of the orchids that I have most resisted growing. Too delicate, perhaps?

The truth is that inside the terrarium, I never use moss for the roots. I just put them on the logs.There is enough moisture in the air so they don't need moss. (in my case, of course). Although I understand that aesthetically it can be better with moss.

The only suspicious thing I see in those images is the black spot on one of the leaves (it may be a virus) and what appears to be insect bites. Have you been able to check if there are any harmful insects for the orchid?
 
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