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i was always wondering this.just how soon does everyone think i should wait to put it in a tank.
i have a rododendron tree branch cut maybe a month and half ago and a branch that is from a harrys/henrys walking stick tree cut about a month ago,i think that is what it is called. they are both about 2½ ft.
just how soon does everyone think i should wait to put it in a tank.
 

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You can put it in right away just be aware that if it dries it may shrink. I've used rhododendron the same day I cut it when I worked at the Zoo.

Ed
 

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Ed,

Is a dry tree branch generally safe for viv use? I want to use some that I have found but I am scared to introduce some potential problems with a branch from outside here.
 

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It depends on what you are concerned about, where the branch was located (for example still on the tree versus resting on the ground versus sitting in your basement for a year....

In general, wood that has not been in contact with the ground and is not rotting anywhere or has holes or hollows is very unlikely to carry unwanted things into the enclosure. Stuff that has been in contact with the ground, and/or has hollows, loose bark or holes is much more likely to have unwanted things hiding in it (like snails).

If you gas it with CO2 keep in mind that aestivating snails may be unaffected.

Ed
 

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I am only concerned with fungal/bacteria/parasite problems. The wood I found is way out in a dried up river bed in the desert. Do you think this would be safe? It's pretty much bleached grey and looks like it's been dry for years.
 

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I would probably just use it. (I can't say for 100% sure since I don't have it in my greedy little hands..)


Ed
 

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if it is dry, there is no chytrid
bacteria shouldn't be an issue
and correct me if i am wrong, but id strongly doubt that a dry piece of wood would be parasited ;P

the most important thing I base my choice of wood, is to make sure it won't literally melt in my viv... i want something that will be the least resistant to mold and aging

i usually pick driftwood on the beaches of a big soft water river here.. then bake them just because i don't want mites or snails
i am not worried about any of what you said, but baking would take care of some of that too i guess.
 
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