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Should I trade my Canon 200mm 2.8L II lens for a Canon 100mm Macro (L or not) so that I can still have a portrait lens for my photography but also a macro for my frogs? Or should I just buy the Kenko extension tubes for my 200mm? Or is that too long a lens for frog macro's?
 

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Adding extension tubes to your 200mm will gain more magnification, but you lose autofocus ability. Not a huge issue, but one you should be aware of. This would be the less expensive option. You will need to be further from the subject than the 100mm macro to get the same magnification ratio, though. For some things, increased working distance is really nice and helpful - some venomous snakes, skittish subjects etc. But sometimes the added working distance required can be a pain - shooting in a vivarium or in other tight situations.

Look for the Kenko extension tube set - three tubes can be used all together, individually or in different combinations. These are essentially hollow tubes, so while the newer Canon ones are nice, you could save some money and have more versatility.

The 100mm macro (non L) I am assuming this is the USM version. There was an older, non USM version (very, very sharp lens) that is also sold used quite a bit.
 

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Well, that really depends. Do you think you will miss anything about the 200/2.8? You could always compromise in the middle and get the Sigma 150mm F/2.8 Macro lens. It's intensely sharp, has HSM, and they offer a model now with OS. I think that will be your best option. Like has been noted, the extra working distance can be a pain sometimes, but, more often than not, it is a plus. It also makes it a little harder to hand-hold at close magnifications. I own the 180/3.5 Sigma Macro and it is an amazing lens. Ive owned their 50, 105, and now 180mm Macro lenses and I would never trade away the HSM of the 180 for macro work. I know that's not what you asked, but it's something to note. Grinding noises and moving front elements have scared off many-a-critter in my time.

Mark
 
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