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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All my frogs (3 azureus and 2 terribillis mint bicolor) tap their longest rear toes whenever i feed them. While it is very cute, and fun to watch, I find myself wondering the reason for this behavior. On one hand it seems to be like a dog wagging its tail, letting everyone know they are happy and healthy (they don't do it when sick or stressed even when feeding). On the other hand, it makes more sense to me thats its a hunting technique, used to distract prey and keep them focused on toes, rather than eyes/mouth. (why, then would stress or illness keep them from tapping?)



(this should probably be a seperate post but i'll give y'all a 2fer)


i have heard that the reason pdf lose toxicity in captivity is their diet, or rather their lack of toxic plant eating critters in their diet. this seems to be a commonly accepted theory. my question is, has anyone tried to prove or disprove this theory? in otherwords, have the toxic plants, and the critters that eat them been positively identified? if so, could these plants be fed to the critters, then fed to a non poisonous cb pdf to make it poisonous again?
(i have no interest in making mine poisonous, just curious) i am certain these topics have been blogged to death, but my search for answeres came up blank. i'm pretty sure that the average jr member here could answer both questions off the top of their head, so just throwing it out there
if pics load- tough to see but if you look real close you can see toes tapping(joshing)
 

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I believe that they are excited when they tap their toes. Maybe the reason they don't do it when sick/stressed is because they dont have the energy?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
talk about an instant response! thanks
heres one more for y'all- why does one of my azureus climb the glass? he will often do it after he eats(aid digestion?), and when there is a lot of condensation on glass(thirsty?), and also when something is blocking his view of the tv.(couch potato nature channel fan like owner?) or is it something more serious like;displaying dominence, or to escape something unpleasant ie temp, humidity, roomates ect?
 

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I have also been very curious to what this is. It is my belief (just a hypothesis) that we are merely seeing an increase in blood pressure. The frog reacts to movement, essentially putting itself into a hunting mode, the frog's body prepares for explosive movement ( i.e., the chase and eventual tongue flick which requires a significant amount of blood pressure) the heart rate dramatically increases and therefore increases the blood flow and the longest and smallest capillary shape (the long middle toe) courses with blood. I'm open to your criticism.
 

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Could be a good point Nillocean! On our dutch forum there was a thread about this also.
Some scientist wrote an article in "Animal Behaviour" they were dutch ecologists (sp.)

They stated that some frogs tap their toes to attract feederanimals and to make them move.

If you guys whish I can try to translate the small article for you guys.

Grtz
 

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I acctually allready translated the article...Well I tried hope you guys can make somehting of it.

Its from : http://noorderlicht.vpro.nl/noorderlog/bericht/40235670/
Grtz!

Ritmic Frogs
Translated by: Dennis Molenaar

Frogs drum. They do this to ensure that their prey keeps moving, two Dutch ecologists announced. If they don’t, they won’t see their prey.

Some scientists believe they tap there toes in order to lure their prey. The moving toes of the Giant Toad (Bufo marinus) attracts little toads and frogs like a magnet. They get curious and move towards the Giant toad to disappear in his enormous mouth.

But not only the cannabalistic Giant Toad tapps his toes. A lot of other frogs and toads also do it, even though they do not eat other frogs, but insects. These insects don’t get wild by a twitching toe. Strange, ecologists John Sloggett and Ilja Zeilstra thought.

Subtile difference between insecteaters and the Giant Toad is, that they don’t simply wave with it , but drum with their toes. Slogget and Zeilstra recorded a movie wehre you can see and hear this. Because this is the reason , they wrote in the magazine “Animal Behaviour”. The toe tapping of the hindlegs result in vibrations, which will make sure insects near the frog keep moving. Frogs and toads are not know because of their very good sight and if the insects don’t move they will simply not see them. Keep on drumming then!

Written by: Remy van den Brand


Source:http://noorderlicht.vpro.nl/noorderlog/bericht/40235670/
 
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I acctually allready translated the article...Well I tried hope you guys can make somehting of it.

Its from : the mind of the universe
Grtz!

Ritmic Frogs
Translated by: Dennis Molenaar

Frogs drum. They do this to ensure that their prey keeps moving, two Dutch ecologists announced. If they don’t, they won’t see their prey.

Some scientists believe they tap there toes in order to lure their prey. The moving toes of the Giant Toad (Bufo marinus) attracts little toads and frogs like a magnet. They get curious and move towards the Giant toad to disappear in his enormous mouth.

But not only the cannabalistic Giant Toad tapps his toes. A lot of other frogs and toads also do it, even though they do not eat other frogs, but insects. These insects don’t get wild by a twitching toe. Strange, ecologists John Sloggett and Ilja Zeilstra thought.

Subtile difference between insecteaters and the Giant Toad is, that they don’t simply wave with it , but drum with their toes. Slogget and Zeilstra recorded a movie wehre you can see and hear this. Because this is the reason , they wrote in the magazine “Animal Behaviour”. The toe tapping of the hindlegs result in vibrations, which will make sure insects near the frog keep moving. Frogs and toads are not know because of their very good sight and if the insects don’t move they will simply not see them. Keep on drumming then!

Written by: Remy van den Brand


Source:the mind of the universe
This is wonderful thank you so much!
 

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What happens when you disrupt leaf litter? Invertebrates move.

My guess is beyond natural curiosity, there is a preference to conserve energy. If you’re existing fully satiated, without predators, in perfect conditions you might wait around. If one of the components to your environment were out of acceptable values, you’d move to adjust.
 
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