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I found some pacific tree frog tadpoles right at the beginning of the lockdown, and brought them home as a project to keep myself and my kids busy. They’re doing great, with most of them out of the water now, and as I’ve only used water and foods from the wetland I collected them from, I plan to set most of them free where I found them.

However, one unlucky fellow got one of his rear legs nipped off when he was still pretty small. I was hoping it would grow back, but it did not, and now I have a three-legged tree frog. I feel bad, and I’d feel worse releasing him to be someone’s easy lunch, so I think I’ve inherited a long-term friend.

He’s come out of the water just fine, but seems a bit clumsy and is having a hard time catching fruit flies. Any tips on making sure he gets enough to eat? Tips in general would be great, actually, as I’m more of a reptile person and pretty new to frogs.
 

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A small crock or bowl, and feed small crickets. Keep the feeding bowl clean. Elevating it on an overturned identical one keeps the feeding bowls position and access uniform and safe.

Please realize that the days of raising tads and letting them go, are no more. It is considered a serious breach of biological hygiene.

Conservatory programs that release animals follow strict protocols, right down to shoe covers and air flow precautionaries.

Pacific Treefrogs can eat crickets and those will be easier to corral and manage for the missing leg guy.
 

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Some more tips would be to surround the feeding container with nice segway planks, cork bark is a wonderful material for this, and a stable stone in the feeding crock is an additional ergo courtesy. Some crickets will get out, but thats ok.

Worms and larvae, like waxworms, small hornworms, are also good food.

That little treefrog can live for years, he can see your kids to college. They are a real treasure, a beautiful little frog.

I like to give them a basking light, to one corner, where there are multiple perching options. this would be one of those situations when a compact UV light would work well.

They will not bask under a led light, and even a low wattage incandescent must be stewarded with full knowledge of its heat capacity.

Dont be tempted to think that because hes a relatively small frog with a missing leg he will be fine in a really little tank. It makes no difference, actually.

After a few months you will be very surprised at how well he can move around
if he has the surface area (cork, branches) to move on Also, the 'higher' ie more complete the amputation the better he will be able to function.
 

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I had a pacific treefrog who nearly cut off his foot jumping into a rock. The vet was able to put a couple of stitches. ok. He walked slowly but he was ok. Animals adapt.
 
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