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Discussion Starter #1
I have a big small spider problem. Big problem, small spiders......

The pest is about 1 mm large, the females... the males are even smaller and the babies just walk through the fruitfly proof ventilation.

We have tried CO2 (dry ice). Worked fine, but the spiders are not only in the tanks, but also in the room..... CO2 bombing the room does not seem like something possible...

So we need to go about this in a different way.

For the Ph Bicolor it is not so much of a problem, they just barge through the webs. Does not look nice all those webs, but no problem.

For the O Pumillo bastimentos rfb's..... well, they are small. I do not think the spiders will attack the thumbs, but the webs could be a potential problem when they try to overtake a bromeliad. Of course i will keep removing the webs and try to catch the spiders, but they are so small and exactly the same colour as the walls and leaves......

So i need another solution. a very small night active gecko?? spider eating mites? spider eating nematodes? who has the solution??
 

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how sure are you that these actually are spiders as opposed to mites? They're both arachnids and what your describing sounds more like some kind of mite to me. Some mites also produce silk just like spiders.
 

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Also look into Diatomaceous earth as a physical barrier to mites. I've been lucky and never had problems with mites for some reason so there will be other people who can give you more specific advice but I've heard good things about diatomaceous earth.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
how sure are you that these actually are spiders as opposed to mites? They're both arachnids and what your describing sounds more like some kind of mite to me. Some mites also produce silk just like spiders.
Nope. Real spider. I’ll try to make a pic.... but i tend to kill them when i see them. Hard to get them out alive.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Also look into Diatomaceous earth as a physical barrier to mites. I've been lucky and never had problems with mites for some reason so there will be other people who can give you more specific advice but I've heard good things about diatomaceous earth.
We use D.E. In our fruitfly cultering “fridge”. No problems any more. Works great.

But this will not work in a frog-tank.

Good thinking though. Thanks.
 

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How long has it been going on?

Spiderlings are usually self limiting. Things really have to be let go for it to go beyond a few eggsacs.

Can you take a pic of them?

By your description i have a feeling there are emotions at play that could cause more upheaval than the spiders.
 

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If they really are spiders and I absolutely take your word for it then do you think they are mainly preying on the flies you feed or is there a lot of other microfauna in the enclosure that they're also feeding on?
Over the years I've had sudden population booms of various small insects in my tanks and they usually find a balance fairly quickly, especially predators.
I feed a tiny predatory rove beetle that also preys on fungus gnat larvae, mites etc. to some of my micro geckos and the various insect populations generally seem to reach a state of dynamic equilibrium in large enough tanks. I have no idea whether something like these rove beetles might prey on your spiders but they do eat insects that size.
I've never heard of any biological controls for spiders full stop however there is a very common folk belief here in Scotland and much of the rest of the UK that horse chestnuts can be used to repel spiders in the home. Doesn't seem likely to me but you never know.
 

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Are you dead certain they are not spider mites? Those things suck. And they make webs / silk. They are much more common a problem with indoor plants & vivaria, than true spiders. They feed on the plants.

Not trying to be a pain. The countermeasures will differ, is the point of asking.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
See images of webs and spiders. first spider is juvenile second is adult size.

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Size is in CM from 0 to 1 is 1 cm.....
 

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Discussion Starter #10
If they really are spiders and I absolutely take your word for it then do you think they are mainly preying on the flies you feed or is there a lot of other microfauna in the enclosure that they're also feeding on?
Over the years I've had sudden population booms of various small insects in my tanks and they usually find a balance fairly quickly, especially predators.
I feed a tiny predatory rove beetle that also preys on fungus gnat larvae, mites etc. to some of my micro geckos and the various insect populations generally seem to reach a state of dynamic equilibrium in large enough tanks. I have no idea whether something like these rove beetles might prey on your spiders but they do eat insects that size.
I've never heard of any biological controls for spiders full stop however there is a very common folk belief here in Scotland and much of the rest of the UK that horse chestnuts can be used to repel spiders in the home. Doesn't seem likely to me but you never know.
The are probably feeding on the spring tales that are there in large numbers and of course on the fruit-flies. That is not going to limit them in numbers.

your micro gecko, which one is that??
 

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It isnt clear whether the 2 sizes comprise adult and juv or just 1rst and second+ instars of separate eggsacs.

Dont discount at least the possibility of a Mom in there that isnt a tiny species but one, once revealed, is easy to remove and dispatch of.

Tiny or not you could manually cull the webs with forceps and destroy the spiders in the process.

After some practice, I bet you get good at it.

You might canvas the environment for Possible Hiding (not tiny) Mom. She will be astute in building her hearth in an aspect not hit by misting or direct light.
 

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It would be really cool to get an ID, exciting but thats jmo. You could email the photos to a university or museum.

Entomologists love to ID. It would benefit the body of DB knowledge.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
It isnt clear whether the 2 sizes comprise adult and juv or just 1rst and second+ instars of separate eggsacs.

Dont discount at least the possibility of a Mom in there that isnt a tiny species but one, once revealed, is easy to remove and dispatch of.

Tiny or not you could manually cull the webs with forceps and destroy the spiders in the process.

After some practice, I bet you get good at it.

You might canvas the environment for Possible Hiding (not tiny) Mom. She will be astute in building her hearth in an aspect not hit by misting or direct light.
Thanks for your reply. But in the (older) Bicolor tank we already have them for a year or 2. and we have seen the eggsacks ( small white disks of around 4-5 mm in diameter). So there is no big mama around. The second is an adult male, the adult females have a more reddish behind. The webs also stay small as you can see in the pictures, but they become many. and with many I mean at least 30-50 per tank if we let it go. That is why we tried CO2 bombing that tank. It did not work, we found them in the light hood as well and also further down in the room. and when we CO2 bombed the tanks, they already appeared in the other tank that was housing the Bicolors for the process..... (without any plants or materials being transferred. they just invaded from the room into the tank.

Yes, we do take daily the webs away. and when we see a spider run, we kill it. But they are not in the webs, but on the sides hiding. harder to get them, then when they would be sitting in the middle of the web.

So, really getting rid of them is probably not possible, but I am looking for ways for nature to keep them in check, at least in the tank with the O. pumillio.

Would a Lepidodactylus lugubris be a solution in the tank?? or is that too big and would it see the Pumillio's as food??
 

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Discussion Starter #14
It would be really cool to get an ID, exciting but thats jmo. You could email the photos to a university or museum.

Entomologists love to ID. It would benefit the body of DB knowledge.
I'll see what I can do.
 

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Would a Lepidodactylus lugubris be a solution in the tank?? or is that too big and would it see the Pumillio's as food??
Mourning geckos would be a threat to your frogs (unlike the spiders, which are at most a very minor nuisance) since they can transmit pathogens and would quite possibly stress froglets in the viv. I don't know exactly how they act toward frogs, but toward each other they can be very rough.

Once MGs stsrt breeding, they are quite impossible to remove wiithout a teardown, IME, and the hatchlings are prone to escaping. They also poop a lot more than frogs, and so make keeping the viv clean much harder.
 

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Thanks for the ID - its a keeper!

I have found geckos as well as other lizards to avoid getting webby. If feet get webby it is a severe hinderence to locomotion - behind a large wooden unit i have retrieved emaciated house geckos with lamellae clotted w cobwebs. I have had false widows in large enclosures that, if some wandering spiders were taken their rate of reproduction surpassed any dent in their populaces. With an abundant alternative insect supply be it crickets or FF, its an ecological food chain theory that really doesnt pan out in practice.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
It seems that if i remove the webs daily it takes too much energy to rebuild them at speed and potentially drain the spiders?? At least it seems to cut down activity and number of webs.
 

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It will definitely create a more inhospitable ecology for them. Yes it will.
 

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What state are you in (if in fact state side)? I have noticed a couple of small web like areas but chalked them up as mold or fungus as I haven’t seen anything and my coverings are enclosed with micro fine stainless steel mesh that water droplets find it hard to fall threw.


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