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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Here's the plant list, if you have any suggestions for alternatives or arrangement, please let me know. I'm still a noob with actually building vivs, I've researched for 8 years before taking the plunge. I specifically chose these plants because the description says they stay small, but like I said, if any of these aren't going to work LET ME KNOW PLEASE <3.

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Selaginella uncinata 'Peacock Spikemoss' | Josh's Frogs

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Davallia tyermanii 'White Rabbit's Foot Fern' | Josh's Frogs

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Ficus pumila 'Quercifolia' - Houseplants | Josh's Frogs

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Neoregelia 'Chiquita Linda' | Josh's Frogs

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Alocasia 'Tiny Dancers' | Josh's Frogs

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Cryptocoryne lucens | Josh's Frogs

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Ficus punctata 'Panama' | Josh's Frogs


This ten gallon was actually the first viv I started building. I also have a 40 gallon on pause (the 40 is my second build)

Here's the http://www.dendroboard.com/forum/pa...0-gallon-build-customer-pics.html#post2634522
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm trying something I haven't seen yet... I'm gonna try using this planted aquarium substrate as my drainage layer. If anyone has tried this and had good/bad experiences, let me know how it worked for you :) thanks in advance!

 

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Oh lord, if I didn't know there's supposed to be a drainage layer, after 8 years of reasearch, I'd tell you guys to ban me from the forum lol :D :p
I think the problem is that it looks like your drainage layer is way too thin. You need a decent amount of space (at least half an inch) to separate the water level from the actual substrate. I use a 2" false bottom in most of my tanks and I don't let the water get above an inch. If you don't properly separate the substrate from the water it will get over-saturated and nasty real quick.

This becomes even more important if you have a drainage layer from the aquarium substrate like you are planning. That stuff will wick water up into your substrate.

Other than that, the hardscaping looks fantastic and I think this could end up be a really cool build for how big it is.
 

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I love the use of space in this tank. Great idea just coming out from one corner. I think it looks excellent. I am with carola, though, that I am not wild about the use of a thin layer of sand for the drainage layer. It is so small that it will get clogged up pretty quickly, I am afraid. In order to be able to use that great hole that you have for drainage, you will need the water to be able to flow to the corner. I think with grains that small, much of the water will be adhering to the boundary layer of the individual grains of sand. I would do pea gravel, at least, if not good ole clay balls or even an egg crate false bottom. I would also go deeper, too. I know you don't have much vertical space in that tank, but I think you will be willing to give up space for a good drainage layer after you have used the tank for a while. If aesthetics are the concern, you can always paint the outside of the tank black where the drainage layer is to conceal it.

Great start!

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I love the use of space in this tank. Great idea just coming out from one corner. I think it looks excellent. I am with carola, though, that I am not wild about the use of a thin layer of sand for the drainage layer. It is so small that it will get clogged up pretty quickly, I am afraid. In order to be able to use that great hole that you have for drainage, you will need the water to be able to flow to the corner. I think with grains that small, much of the water will be adhering to the boundary layer of the individual grains of sand. I would do pea gravel, at least, if not good ole clay balls or even an egg crate false bottom. I would also go deeper, too. I know you don't have much vertical space in that tank, but I think you will be willing to give up space for a good drainage layer after you have used the tank for a while. If aesthetics are the concern, you can always paint the outside of the tank black where the drainage layer is to conceal it.

Great start!

Mark
I would never use sand D:
I have 2" in there, I just pushed the gravel down at the edges for the photo. I had no idea this stuff wicks moisture, in that case, I'll just stick my eggcrate in there. I do need an area with the aquarium substrate for my Cryptocoryne lucens, but I'm not adding any water feature because this tank is just way too small for that.
 

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I would never use sand D:
I have 2" in there, I just pushed the gravel down at the edges for the photo. I had no idea this stuff wicks moisture, in that case, I'll just stick my eggcrate in there. I do need an area with the aquarium substrate for my Cryptocoryne lucens, but I'm not adding any water feature because this tank is just way too small for that.
My mistake, Loki. When looking at the picture, I thought the bag you were showing had sand in it. I didn't realize it was opaque :) That stuff looks suspiciously like the Ecocomplete I have in my planted tank. Does the stuff look volcanic? If so and if it's like Ecocomplete, it might be too abrasive to use above the water line for the frogs. I would worry about it cutting their thin skin, but maybe that's just me. I had to replace my 90 recently because of years of that stuff getting between the algae pad and the glass and it scratching up my glass. It's pretty sharp in spots...

If you are growing the crypts semi-immersed then it would probably be a great substrate for them since they are root feeders. I would just make sure it's below the water level. I also think it it is fine-grained enough that it might wick up to your substrate.

I am interested in seeing how this one turns out! Thumbies will really enjoy that layout, I think.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Yes, it's that volcanic type rock, very scratchy, it's like regular aquarium gravel sized pieces. Barely smaller than a pea, with a few smaller bits. It will all be covered up. I actually came up with another idea instead of taking the aquarium substrate out I'll leave it in around 1" and add an inch of something that doesn't wick moisture. Maybe two layers of eggcrate just zip tied together. That would still allow my water loving plants' roots to reach down into the gravel. Under all my wood there's a 1.5" x 3" rectangular clearance with screen siliconed in place for all the water to reach my port in the back while keeping frogs out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
As for frogs, those won't come for at least another 6 months to a year. But I've already picked a few different ones I'm considering. I want just a male and a female so finding sexed pairs isn't always easy. I may end up settling for a frog that isn't my favorite. I really want a pair of Ranitomeya lamasi buuuuut those are $250 per frog and I guess they won't even sell them to you unless you're a master dart breeder. So I've been waiting for maybe 3
Ranitomeya ventrimaculata. I really LOVE Ranitomeya variabilis, but I feel like green on green I won't actually see them much besides a little green blur out of the corner of my eye lol. So, I think I wanna go with reds, oranges, yellows, and blue/black. I may end up with these http://www.joshsfrogs.com/sexed-pair-dendrobates-ventrimaculatus-french-guiana-yellow-for-sale.html they aren't my favorite but I still love them anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
This is the light I'll be testing for this build, there aren't many options when it comes to florescent lights for a ten gallon. I know I do NOT want to use CFLs. They don't produce enough light for me. Not only that but this cool little clip light has moonlight LEDs:) and it was only $40! Hopefully it gives me some really good growth.

Also, I'm in search for a cutting of marcgravia PRETTY PLEASE <3 if anyone has any, let's talk prices :)
 

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I think you'll be fine with that drainage layer. I have a 10 gallon (my first build) that's been running for nearly 5 years and honestly, I've never had to drain any water. Once the plant roots get down to the water level, they suck up a large portion of the water. I have a traditional eggcrate FB and it cost me valuable vertical height.
 
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