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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have been preparing my terrarium for a pair of Leucs and have been monitoring the temps of the tank. It gets pretty cold at night in my small apartment and my heater doesn’t turn on at night much because it’s in my bedroom with the doors close compared to the small living room with my frog tank. When I wake up in the morning and check the tank temps it’s down to about 64-65F. I don’t know if it drops even lower in the night when I’m not awake, but wanted to check if this nightly low is ok? The tank stays around 70-73 during the day when the heater is on and running. Also in summer time the house stays a warmer temp around 75ish.
 

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I have leucs and my Temps are about 70-73/4 during the day and drop only slightly at night. I've read that the ideal temperature for leucs is between 70-80 F with a drop to 67 during the night.
I think your frogs could be fine, but I would try to raise the temp a bit.
Hopefully more experienced keepers will lend a hand with their knowledge.
 

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Those temps - 65F low with a daily boost to the low 70s - are quite tolerable, though the frogs may be more reclusive than at slightly higher temps.

If you can put the viv in the warmer room, that would be ideal, but I'd not try to supplement heat directly to the viv, as the cons of that outweigh the pros in this situation.

BTW, while an IR temp gun is best for checking viv temps, a tabletop digital thermometer (like this one) is a useful tool for tracking daily room temps (just don't use it to monitor viv humidity ;)).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Those temps - 65F low with a daily boost to the low 70s - are quite tolerable, though the frogs may be more reclusive than at slightly higher temps.

If you can put the viv in the warmer room, that would be ideal, but I'd not try to supplement heat directly to the viv, as the cons of that outweigh the pros in this situation.

BTW, while an IR temp gun is best for checking viv temps, a tabletop digital thermometer (like this one) is a useful tool for tracking daily room temps (just don't use it to monitor viv humidity ;)).
thanks for your comments
 

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Those temps - 65F low with a daily boost to the low 70s - are quite tolerable, though the frogs may be more reclusive than at slightly higher temps.

If you can put the viv in the warmer room, that would be ideal, but I'd not try to supplement heat directly to the viv, as the cons of that outweigh the pros in this situation.

BTW, while an IR temp gun is best for checking viv temps, a tabletop digital thermometer (like this one) is a useful tool for tracking daily room temps (just don't use it to monitor viv humidity ;)).
Hope it's okay to jump in, why wouldn't you want to use that device to monitor humidity?
 

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It isn't that device, it is the practice of monitoring RH that I recommend against, for these reasons (I'm sure I've missed a couple):

  • RH meters aren't all that accurate (+/- 5% at best)
  • RH meter sensors fail in condensing environments (such as dart vivs) and give data that leads to detrimental actions from the keeper
  • the RH at an arbitrary location in the viv doesn't tell much at all about the RH range in the viv; there is a 100% RH location and a 50% RH location in every one of my vivs, and all gradations in between.
  • the amount of water in a viv and ventilation combine to cause a certain RH, but those two elements themselves are much, much more important to frog health than RH so looking to RH as a measure of viv moisture is very misleading
  • if RH is "out of range", novice keepers don't tend to know whether to adjust ventilation or adjust water additions; after learning to judge where ventilation and viv water levels should be through very short experience, regular RH monitoring can be simply noise.
  • there is always a moist spot (or many) in a dart viv, and the frogs know where those spots are; when the frogs retreat to those spots at a certain point in the daily drying cycle, that's the point at which the viv has dried sufficiently. Frogs are better moisture meters than any digital readout, don't need batteries and are more enjoyable to interact with. :)

Personally, I've found RH monitoring to be useful in keeping reptile species that are kept in minimalistic housing -- enclosures that don't offer real opportunities for moisture gradients, which is every enclosure that's not at least 5 or so times the animal's length. If I kept a five foot rainbow boa in a 20 foot long enclosure, I'd skip the RH meter and let the snake tell me where the best moisture is. Since we do keep darts in enclosures that offer these opportunities, targeting some ideal moisture level at some arbitrary location in the viv isn't useful; watching the frogs' choices is useful.
 

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I've had Dendrobates sp. get down into the 40s for as long as 2 weeks with no apparent issues and a friend of mine in Sweden often has his get into the mid 50sF with no apparent ill effects as a routine for years. Amphibians if allowed to acclimate to a cooler or warmer regimen are more able to tolerate sudden shifts in the cold acclimated animals but this also results in a lower tolerance to high end temperature for those amphibians, it's the opposite for warm acclimated frogs. It should be noted many tropical countries can have seasonal nighttime drops into the 60sF or lower depending on altitude from the low 80sF or upper 70s F so these frogs are a lot hardier than you are often led to believe.

Some comments
Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I've had Dendrobates sp. get down into the 40s for as long as 2 weeks with no apparent issues and a friend of mine in Sweden often has his get into the mid 50sF with no apparent ill effects as a routine for years. Amphibians if allowed to acclimate to a cooler or warmer regimen are more able to tolerate sudden shifts in the cold acclimated animals but this also results in a lower tolerance to high end temperature for those amphibians, it's the opposite for warm acclimated frogs. It should be noted many tropical countries can have seasonal nighttime drops into the 60sF or lower depending on altitude from the low 80sF or upper 70s F so these frogs are a lot hardier than you are often led to believe.

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Ed
Thanks Ed. I don’t think my house will ever get that cold haha. But it’s good to know that I’m all set!
 

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I've had Dendrobates sp. get down into the 40s for as long as 2 weeks with no apparent issues and a friend of mine in Sweden often has his get into the mid 50sF with no apparent ill effects as a routine for years. Amphibians if allowed to acclimate to a cooler or warmer regimen are more able to tolerate sudden shifts in the cold acclimated animals but this also results in a lower tolerance to high end temperature for those amphibians, it's the opposite for warm acclimated frogs. It should be noted many tropical countries can have seasonal nighttime drops into the 60sF or lower depending on altitude from the low 80sF or upper 70s F so these frogs are a lot hardier than you are often led to believe.

Some comments
Ed

Wow that's chilly! I also get warm summers so I don't want them to lose their ability to handle high(ish) temps, but nice to know they might be okay with a cold snap. I did some experiments with the lights and with some fluorescence bulbs, it raised the temps a couple degrees so I think that should be perfect. Summer I might switch to LEDs for less heat.
 

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One problem with low temps that shouldn't be ignored is that frogs hide quite a bit more at the low end of the range (starting in the 60s), and this can be very hard for someone new to dart keeping, without an understanding of baseline activity levels and how that is affected by environmental parameters, to work through.
 
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