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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I have a beautifully grown in tank that used to house a pair of pumilio. I woul hate to tear it down as it is one of my favorite tanks with one or two rare plants. Is it a crazy thought that if I use my CO2 generate it could kill any parasites in the tank? I would assume parasites need oxygen just like the animals. Any thoughts?
 

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sorry buddy. No dice. Bacteria can easily live through your bombing, so can many nematodes and other nasties. If youre really worried, best bet is a tear down
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm not worried about the frogs having parasites that were in there before cause the fecal came back good but don't most people tear down their vivs when adding new frogs to the tank or should I not worry bout tearing it down?
 

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If the previous frogs came back with clean fecals I wouldnt worry too much about it
 

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Just fyi, I had frogs come back clean on the first fecal and dirty on one a week later so it's best to fecal them more than once
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Is this a common thing to test fecals and one day it's good and another day it's not? That just is new news to me.
 

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there are cycles in the life of worms...and not all fecals catch the worms at the precise point in the cycle that the test would reveal...it happens with all animal species...
Judy is spot on. We always recommend recheck fecals at the hospital because several conditions need to be met to see eggs in the sample. Sexually mature adults need to be present and they may or may not be shedding eggs. Some standard preparatory reagents also don't "float" (you mix the stool with a high specific gravity solution to cause the eggs to float to the surface to isolate and concentrate them, hence the name of the test "fecal float",) eggs of all species or cause some species eggs to deteriorate in a way that makes them difficult to identify.

So yes to rechecking if there's a concern. Also make sure your vet is knowledgeable of the common parasites of PDFs.

Edit: Not all GI parasites are worm like of course, such as Giardia, which is often viewed most easily with a different technique than is typically used for "worm type" parasites and can complicate diagnosis.
 

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It may be a worthwhile topic to explain even further with suggestions of how to space fecals..truthfully, I am only familiar with horses but do understand how the tests may not be conclusive...please give some more information and advice for noobies as I am about frogs...for the money that may be invested in these animals, it might be the cheapest part for the longevity of the purchase...
 

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I'd love to if I knew :) My clinical experience has been almost entirely with cats and dogs, I just recently got into darts. With a little digging in the literature we could probably find which parasites are most common in darts and what the life cycles of those parasites are to determine an appropriate retesting schedule. My research advisor is a parasitologist so I'll ask him what they look at to determine that timing.

As far as technique, most vets would probably recommend sticking with something fairly standard that "covers the bases" of what you're typically looking for and what matches clinical signs if there's a problem. If it's negative but the problem persists, they may recommend going about it a different way at the next recheck. That's how we did it with cats and dogs with GI upset, if we didn't see your typically payload of roundworms or what have you, the doc sometimes recommended looking specifically for giardia depending on the risk of exposure and such. So I think a lot of that diagnostic style is doctor dependent.

It would be worth knowing what you're typically looking for on a fecal for PDFs though, and I'm curious now. (I bet Ed already have a file of PDFs and parasites stashed away!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Loving all this information!!! Keep it coming :)

I'd love to if I knew :) My clinical experience has been almost entirely with cats and dogs, I just recently got into darts. With a little digging in the literature we could probably find which parasites are most common in darts and what the life cycles of those parasites are to determine an appropriate retesting schedule. My research advisor is a parasitologist so I'll ask him what they look at to determine that timing.

As far as technique, most vets would probably recommend sticking with something fairly standard that "covers the bases" of what you're typically looking for and what matches clinical signs if there's a problem. If it's negative but the problem persists, they may recommend going about it a different way at the next recheck. That's how we did it with cats and dogs with GI upset, if we didn't see your typically payload of roundworms or what have you, the doc sometimes recommended looking specifically for giardia depending on the risk of exposure and such. So I think a lot of that diagnostic style is doctor dependent.

It would be worth knowing what you're typically looking for on a fecal for PDFs though, and I'm curious now. (I bet Ed already have a file of PDFs and parasites stashed away!)
 
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