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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have seen some people say that they mist their tanks once a day and others say that they mist four to six times a day. I know that it can be a variable to start breeding, so you might mist more then. It is very dry here in Colorado and once I have the airconditioner and ceiling fans going my tanks can dry up pretty fast. I have started trying to spray them more due to that but I am having issues with the substrate getting soggy. I just wanted to know how to get around that. Would too much venting in the tank be my main problem? Also what is everyone's opinion on venting? Do you prefer venting a tank, and if so how much is appropriate, or is a solid glass top a better way to go to keep in humidity?

Thanks
-Shelley
 

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Its good to have vents there always as an option. And you can regulate how much venitation you want to use by covering up part of the screen( as much or as little as you need) with another piece of glass some plastic wrap. This gives you more control to regulate things.
 
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if you have a false bottom set up you dont have to worry about the dirt staying wet. it will just drain right through =)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
True, and I do have a false bottom. Maybe I am just spraying TOO much though, because the bottom will even fill up and flood the substrate. Do you just have to allow time for the water in the bottom to evaporate or should I try to drain it?

-Shelley
 

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Shelley,

I am spraying my azureus twice a day, and water does indeed build up in the bottom. I do not use a false bottom, i just have the clay pellets. However i do have a drain that i put in so i can drain it when it gets to be too deep.

Not sure if that helps any, but it gives you an idea what i do, since i too am in colorado.
 
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What i did was put a piece of 1/2" pvc in the corner with holes drilled in the bottom. it goes all the way from the bottom of the tank under the false bottom to the very top and fits flush against the glass lid. when the water starts to build up, i just pop my shop-vac on the end of that pipe and suck out the excess water. takes a total of 40 seconds. easy =)
 

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i was going to go the same route as drunknmunky, but my tank is front opening, so it was easier to drill a drain.
 

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shop vac....lol

Michael,

You are too funny. I know you are being serious...never heard of anyone using a shop vac on their tank, but it would make short work out of the process.

Melis

drunknmunky said:
What i did was put a piece of 1/2" pvc in the corner with holes drilled in the bottom. it goes all the way from the bottom of the tank under the false bottom to the very top and fits flush against the glass lid. when the water starts to build up, i just pop my shop-vac on the end of that pipe and suck out the excess water. takes a total of 40 seconds. easy =)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hah! That is a great idea drunknmunky. Do you silicone the pvc in? Also, we are going to be putting in a swamp cooler pretty soon. Has anyone had any experience with one? I am hoping that it will help to add some humidity to the house (since CO has got to be one of the top driest states out there) and help with the dart tanks. Thanks for the help guys.

-Shelley
 

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When I worked in a large pet store, a shop vac was always useful. We used them to primarily clean up floods, but they were great for things like draining tanks as well. A gravel vac can only drain so far, and then you could suck out all of the leftover sludge with a shop vac.
 
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the more and more time i spend on this board, i realize that the less i know about the hobby is actually benificial because i dont know what you can and cant do :D

A shop vac was my first though so i built that into the tank. no one ever told me not to, so i did!

The funny thing is that it doesn't seem to bother the frogs at all, they just look up at me hoping to get fed.

snmreptiles: It's not acutally siliconed in, per se. It is behind a cork bark curl that is silconed in and packed between the glass with ground coconut fiber. It's not going anywhere i'm positive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Cool, thanks drunknmunky! And thanks for the tip Greaser. I covered up some of my vents in a couple tanks with that press-n-seal wrap and it seems to have helped a bit. I have done the same thing in my terribilis tanks so I don't know why I didn't think of it for the others :oops: . Thanks again everyone.

-Shelley
 
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