Dendroboard banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello there,

Today I came back from class, looked at my frogs, and was startled to see my male Green legged Panguana transporting a tad around! I knew that they'd laid eggs in a variety of places, but I didn't know any of them had been so developed. Anyway, it was quite a pleasant surprise to come home to.

Now, fast-forward to 10 hours later. He's still hopping around with the tadpole stuck on his back. I was just wondering if this was at all a regular amount of time for him to carry it. He is acting normal, and even spent some time calling and trying to get the female's attention. It just seems to me like he should have deposited it somewhere by now. The tank has a brom that holds a good amount of water, and four film cannisters tilted at various vertical angles that all contain water, any of which seemingly should make suitable deposition sites. Is there anything I should be doing differently or that I should know in this situation, or is this how long it normally takes this process to happen?

Thanks much!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,827 Posts
I don't have an experience based answer for you, but have you placed vertical film canisters at the bottom of the tank yet?? I've seen some people's setup like that before.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,324 Posts
Tadpole transport duration seems to vary....I've seen tricolor males lugging their tad-pack around for almost 3 days at times.

Good luck with the GL lamasi.

Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for all the encouraging replies so far :).

So by the term "tad-pack" I should assume he'll pick up other tads when they're ready and just add them to his load? There's still three visible eggs that have very developed tadpoles inside...

Oh, and he's still carrying the original one around, at least 24 hours later here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,324 Posts
Thumbs tend to transport one tad at a time while species that produce large numbers of eggs/tadpoles (Epipedobates, Phyllobates) can be seen lugging a large group of tads around. The March photo contest winner is a good example.

Bill
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top