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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

The left rear leg of one of my imitator tads has been growing in more slowly / less developed than the other leg. (From what I’ve read, this might be a product of SLS, although I’m not sure)

His front legs seem to be OK, and he seems to have use of his stunted leg (swimming, scooting, etc) so I’m planning on letting him grow out and see how he fares out of the water.

Any thoughts? (Pictures included, although it’s kind of hard to capture)





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I think its too early to frame it as a stunted leg.
 

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I think its too early to frame it as a stunted leg.
I agree. I sure don't like the angle at which that foot is attached, though. Could just be the pictures. Will be interesting to see how he continues to develop.

Mark
 

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I agree. I sure don't like the angle at which that foot is attached, though. Could just be the pictures. Will be interesting to see how he continues to develop.

Mark
Good catch Mark. Totally missed the wonky foot angle. I really don't think SLS is the culprit. Most of the time SLS manifests in the front legs.
I am wondering if it could be a case of physical damage as a tiny tad, or even as an embryo.
Did your tads spend any time together, communally raised? When Ranitomeyas are raised together, if someone gets hungry, those dangling rear legs can sometimes become a target for a quick, high protein snack.
 

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It doesnt look particularly fixed out of normal range to me, but more than just one view would be necessary to determine it.
 

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It doesnt look particularly fixed out of normal range to me, but more than just one view would be necessary to determine it.
Yeah, I haven't had much experience with this, personally. I have been fortunate (or not?) that most of the problems my tads have had with development have been show stoppers. They don't usually make it long. This sort of thing can happen, but pay attention if it becomes common. There could be husbandry or genetic issues if this is more than an outlier. Hopefully, this ends up not being an issue and this little fella ends up coming out of the water strong and healthy. It is very subtle and, as Kmc said, it could even just be a trick of angle of the pictures or whatever. A video would be more telling, showing how he holds that leg/foot and if the two sides move mostly in unison.

Mark
 

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Definitely worth giving him a little more time.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the insight everyone. I’m going to try uploading a video of him moving.

The leg in question is definitely funky, it is a little smaller, and the foot does not seem to position properly when sitting.

It’s still a young froglet so I expect it’s movements will get more graceful with time, but there is definitely something wrong with it. He seems functional enough now, but I think the true test will be if he’s able to catch enough food to grow.

So far, out of 4 froglets, it’s the only one with issues, hopefully not something that reoccurs!

Video and stills: https://imgur.com/gallery/RodJ7Vl


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Good catch Mark. Totally missed the wonky foot angle. I really don't think SLS is the culprit. Most of the time SLS manifests in the front legs.
I am wondering if it could be a case of physical damage as a tiny tad, or even as an embryo.
Did your tads spend any time together, communally raised? When Ranitomeyas are raised together, if someone gets hungry, those dangling rear legs can sometimes become a target for a quick, high protein snack.

I’ve raised the tads all individually from eggs so far, so we can rule out cannibalism.

Physical damage as an embryo or tad — maybe? I try to practice care when handling them, especially early on.


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Thanks for the insight everyone. I’m going to try uploading a video of him moving.

The leg in question is definitely funky, it is a little smaller, and the foot does not seem to position properly when sitting.

It’s still a young froglet so I expect it’s movements will get more graceful with time, but there is definitely something wrong with it. He seems functional enough now, but I think the true test will be if he’s able to catch enough food to grow.

So far, out of 4 froglets, it’s the only one with issues, hopefully not something that reoccurs!

Video and stills: https://imgur.com/gallery/RodJ7Vl

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Yeah, I think you called it. There is just something not quite right. If he is able to feed normally, you could keep him separately. He is awfully cute :) If he is not able to feed normally, he might need to be culled or the problem might take care of itself :(

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Update: it’s been a few weeks and I’ve been observing the froglet, he seems to be doing OK! Despite his leg issue, he navigates the grow out tank quite well, and is taking melanogaster fruit flies.

I’ve even got him housed with 3 siblings who are all fully able-bodied as an experiment, and he still seems to be putting on weight. Knock on wood, but I think he is going to be able to live a relatively normal life.

Here are some more pictures... it looks like the problem leg is somehow fused together, where the thigh and calf are connected:





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