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Over the last few months there have been rumours and comments about exports of wild caught animals halting or being discontinued.

There is some truth to this matter as the international trade in dendrobatids has been under scrutiny for some time now. See the free pdf here http://www.vincentnijman.org/files/a88_nijmanshepherd_poisonarrowfrog_biodivconserv_2.pdf

As it links up what could be a smuggling route for the frogs.

As a result CITES has taken up interest in the topic and has begun investigating it (see http://www.cites.org/common/com/SC/57/E57-29-02A2.pdf for the appropriate discussion).

Some points to ponder,


Ed
 

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Very interesting study. I'd like to see the place in Nicaragua that breed 3000 pum's in 2004. Their really good! I took several thoughts away from this study:
1) Smuggling of these items is a real problem & could easily result in an inability to ever get legitimate frogs from some countries.
2) With the destruction of habitat & increased world demand some of our collections could represent frogs that you'd be hard pressed to ever see in the wild.
3) Therefore we need to be good stewards of what we have.

Brian
 

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I have a few thoughts and questions on those links but for now this is a serious reason for this hobby to get it together and put together a much better plan for the long term. Better mgmt, tracking down the last of the unrelated lines and puting together breeding projects both in groups and even one hobbyist at a time.

Its only a matter of time before we are limited to whats left here. Smuggling and loss of habitat are the reasons enough to take this on. Hell look at the ideas of some to create grass green terribs and greener Imis. We need to get the lines together and tracked before they are all mixed and lost.


Michael
 
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