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Welcome to DB, and potentially to frog-keeping. :)

If you'd like to keep frogs (lovely animals to keep), research species first. This will take some time, especially if you're not yet sure what family of frogs you're interested in.

Once you've narrowed down a species or two that you'd like to keep, then make sure you're up for all the care requirements -- is your home cool or warm enough; are you willing to deal with the feeders it requires; is it too noisy for your living situation; is it financially feasible (animals + housing + ongoing supplies + potential vet bills). Is it a species that breeds in captivity without intervention, and how might that be handled?

Then research what the ideal (not bare minimum) dimensions and design the viv should be, and purchase that equipment. In no case will the ideal housing for any frog species be a tall bowfront fish tank, I'm certain -- and skimping/making due with inadequate/inappropriate equipment makes the challenge of caring for delicate animals much more difficult.

Hope this helps. :)
 

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I am curious as to the reasons why the bow front isn't ideal. Is it due to the lack of air circulation? Or potentially that the bow makes it more exposed so harder for frogs to feel secure?
Yes, lack or airflow and the challenges in rectifying that.

Also, access from the top is difficult (it isn't the same as accessing a fish tank, as some folks seem to expect it to be). Removing water from the drainage layer would be very hard from above; drilling a drain would be virtually necessary (though this is nice to do in any case).

Also, the footprint shape isn't great for hardscaping -- and this is a place where novice keepers often come up short (it isn't much like fish tank design, contrary to some assumptions) -- and hardscape design is very important for frogs. A good hardscape for dart frogs in that tank will yield a viv from which the frogs are impossible to remove (frogs sometimes need a trip to the vet, or a dominant/submissive frog removed, or froglets pulled, or eggs pulled).

More, though, my point was that choosing a species first and then optimizing housing (etc) for that species is always going to lead to better results than shoehorning something in to a non-purpose designed enclosure for convenience's sake. This may not seem true, since there's a common sense but incorrect notion that simply "checking all the boxes" is sufficient, but it doesn't always work out that way in practice.
 
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