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Stages of frog development purchase Poll

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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello all,

I wanted to post up a poll regarding purchasing frogs at different age groups and the Pro/Cons of each. As I assume many are wondering at what age the frog should be when purchased.

Main question is: If someone was to purchase an Adult frog will they miss out the experience and pleasure of viewing the frog develop and grow up from a Juvenile?

(*Note: The total cost of the frog goes from low to high based on the poll and it's correlated to the age of the frog also)
 

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I voted juvi, because it is the best balance between price and hardiness. Though proven breeders are nice as they can quickly pay for themselves if you know what you're doing.
 

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Sub-Adult (6+ months OOW) for group frogs.
Adult Frog where sex is known for paired Tinctorius etc.
 

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Main question is: If someone was to purchase an Adult frog will they miss out the experience and pleasure of viewing the frog develop and grow up from a Juvenile?
I actually love to see tadpoles for sale/trade. I think it would be a lot of fun to have my first experience with a new species be through the lens of watching it develop and take shape in my own home. However, with that said, I'd also realize that there's a large risk of losing tads which I'd be willing to deal with. I'm open to the idea of buying tads, but I can definitely see the wisdom in buying juvenile or older frogs. Much safer, and it allows a much higher probability for success. I'd say that for most people juveniles are the better choice. Plus at some point your frogs will probably breed so you do end up getting to see the life-cycle first hand anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I actually love to see tadpoles for sale/trade. I think it would be a lot of fun to have my first experience with a new species be through the lens of watching it develop and take shape in my own home. However, with that said, I'd also realize that there's a large risk of losing tads which I'd be willing to deal with. I'm open to the idea of buying tads, but I can definitely see the wisdom in buying juvenile or older frogs. Much safer, and it allows a much higher probability for success. I'd say that for most people juveniles are the better choice. Plus at some point your frogs will probably breed so you do end up getting to see the life-cycle first hand anyway.
I agree. I was just assuming someone newer to this hobby while still working on husbandry skills would potentially have more successful rate with an older frog (example Older Juv 4-5+ month). For someone who has kept frogs before and husbandry skills are up to par would it be more beneficial to buy Juvs or Adults, and must weight price comparison also?
 

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Hello all,

I wanted to post up a poll regarding purchasing frogs at different age groups and the Pro/Cons of each. As I assume many are wondering at what age the frog should be when purchased.

Main question is: If someone was to purchase an Adult frog will they miss out the experience and pleasure of viewing the frog develop and grow up from a Juvenile?

(*Note: The total cost of the frog goes from low to high based on the poll and it's correlated to the age of the frog also)
I voted for everything except the youngest groups. I like to raise my frogs to a decent age to help ensure they will survive with their new owner, esp. since I ship out often. I will not ship tadpoles either just b/c I don't want to unknowingly pass on one that might develop SLS or other abnormality to an unsuspecting hobbyist.

Adult frogs come with the benefit of proven survival skills that help them hack it in the long run. So, I'd sell subadults to people moderately experienced, and adults or pairs to those interested in breeding.

Also, buying a froglet that is at least over 4 months of age gives you a better chance that they will make it, and at 8 months you have a very good chance of survival. Before that, it's a bit of a gamble.
 
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