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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I got my box from Understory this week, and the main attraction was 6 Cruziohyla calcarifer, the Splendid Leaf Frog. I have been working on getting these frogs for almost a year. I have built 4 different "Tree Frog" vivariums in my build cycle ranging from 13 gals (approx.) to just over 60 gallons. This turns out to have been a good idea because they were fairly small- 1.5" - 2.25". It took me back to my baby RETF days and keeping them in a smaller enclosure has always been the best way to make sure the babies can find their crickets. To that end they are actually in a five gallon inside the 60 gallon and quite well acclimated now. They will graduate up in size as they grow.
These little nippers will get bigger than Red Eyed Tree Frogs, but not quite as large as the Phyllomedusa bicolor (the Psychedelic Tree Frog). They have been on my list for quite some time, so I'm extremely psyched about having some.
This group came from the Costa Rican Amphibian Research Center via Understory so their purchase aids in conservation instead of bypassing it. I would strongly suggest that if you are interested in this species you do the same and check out the Understory Enterprises website.
Below is a link to the CRARC page on them.This is an Embed of their image of an adult:


https://cramphibian.com/splendid-leaf-frog/
 

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These are absolutely beautiful frogs. When I went on vacation with my family to Costa Rica 2 years ago, I spent a day travelling to and back from the CRARC and to meet Brian. He had an amazing facility and really is doing amazing work, so I would also highly endorse going through the CRARC. Ravage, update us as these beauties grow so we can follow along as well. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'll try and get some pics at night. they are growing well. One of them is REALLY growing, and I may further split them up for a while just so the smaller guys can eat in peace.
Interestingly, Andrew Gray of the Manchester Museum just published a paper on the Genus and there is question now as to whether they are C. calcarifer or C. sylviae (a new species he has described that has been masquerading as calcarifers all along.) Read about C. sylviae here:https://frogblogmanchester.com/2018/07/30/new-splendid-species-discovered-2/
They are too small to tell if they have developed calcars (a cartilage flap on the heels that looks like a small spur when walking). Other morphological differences are still inconclusive at this size. It was really cool to read his paper and then walk over and look at them as I went along. I might have to edit my title, but perhaps not. Both species are beautiful, so there's no worries. just a real coincidence to spend about a year prepping for these babies, and then their very lineage is in question. I'm not going to tell them yet, they are too young for an identity crisis.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Re: Sylvia's leaf frog ( C. sylviae)

Notice the new title.
It has been confirmed. These frogs belong to the newly described species: Cruziohyla sylviae (Sylvia's Leaf Frog). Thanks to Andrew Gray, the Costa Rican Amphibian Research Center and Understory Enterprises in helping me determine the ultimate line of these little buggers.
This has happened before, and will happen again, as researchers study and use new techniques to determine speciation and re-order clades of all creatures. it is truly a interesting time to be alive. ( What's next? **** sapiens confingo ?)
These changes can be confusing, like the whole ventrimaculata re-shuffle. But in this case, we have a new species that has been "hiding in plain sight". This is probably because of the scarcity of individuals that have show up in trade (hobby). Dr. Gray's study suggests that there are only about 160 specimens of the confused Cruziohyla sp. in captivity in zoos and museums. About 60% are C. sylviae and 40% are C. calcarifer. They look pretty similar, but I (personally) think the sylviae are a bit cooler looking than the calcarifer. I'll ask permission and see if I can post a couple of pics to demonstrate the difference.
I am personally pleased to have some frogs named after a little girl who lives in England: Sylvia's Leaf Frogs. Brilliant!
 

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Re: Sylvia's leaf frog ( C. sylviae)

I got some good shots at roll call this morning. Not great posers, these guys; once they are disturbed in the morning they shrink down into their sleeping forms and melt back into the background. I also included the new label for their tank. I had to get out the label machine- the final end to the re-naming kerfuffle.
 

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your photos have influenced me to put a deposit on 6 (just arranging an upcoming date for pickup).
I keep saying i need to stop spending money on frogs....
 

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Hey all,
BBC did a piece on Sylvia's Tree Frog with Andy Gray the frog master of Manchester and the Author of the paper that named this new species.
Check it out:
https://vimeo.com/282575964
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Just an update.
Everyone is growing well. They eat like little hogs. I appear to have one female and the rest are males. She is definitely the largest, and I have segregated them by size. Here she is with the largest male. She is 2.5" SVL.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
my 6 are still too young to tell. I am actually finishing their 36x18x36 exo today
I was advised to keep them in a smaller tank while they grow out. So I am advising you do the same. They are a bit clutzy when feeding while small. Less area equals easier feeding. I have 3 available vivariums for them right now- a 36 X 18 X 24, a 22 X 18 X 16 and a 12 X 12 X 18. The smaller ones are still in a sideways 5 gal in the largest viv.
Keep the water dishes shallow- I use a petri dish and change it out daily. Watch them closely for feeding aggression. That doesn't mean stop sleeping and watch them. Just make sure everyone stays plump. If someone is not feeding- move them, and maybe a small buddy for company. They will grow fast, and they will get skinny fast if they are not eating. Don't spend any time cogitating whether they will be fine if you just feed more. Separate them as needed and as they grow.
These frogs are terribly rare and we're lucky to have them. Welcome to the club!
I keep both Darts and the larger tree frogs. Darts seem to be a bit tougher when young. Tree frogs can be fragile when small; helicopter parenting is okay with them.
And remember- they are going to get BIG. Feed feed feed. I feed 3-5 times a week. At least every other day, if they look thin feed two days in a row. Don't feed them every day, however. Poop production is a good measure- they need to poop regularly. They can get constipated. All tree frogs can prolapse from constipation in my experience. That can be fatal if not addressed immediately. (Forgive me if you already know all of this).
But- Watch them grow, and watch that side banding, it really develops as they get older.
Post your pics on this thread if you want. Maybe we'll end up creating a care sheet with this thread.
Congratulations.
 

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great advice! i keep both darts and red eyes as well - but am always up for advice! no ego here. Current Frogroom includes

- Red Eyes
- Tiger Leg (Phyllomedusa Hypochondrialis)
- Whites Tree Frog (Blue Eye)

- Azureus
- Leucomela
- Citronella
- Auratus El Cope
- Terribilis (Yellow)

- Blue Jeans
- Man Creek

- Chazuta
- Varadero
 
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