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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Plant Purple Nature Botany Organism


Okay. I've got some questions, because I've been lurking alot, learning all I can before getting my frogs (will be buying at the end of October for my birthday 馃巶)

Here's some things I've seen and would really like some feedback on what I should be believing.... Numbered for ease of answering questions pls put the # you're answering so it's easier for me to respond or know which one you're referring to, cause I know I have LOTS of questions 馃槀

1- don't have your tank constantly wet but... 馃憞 See #2
2- many tanks I see are so drenched that the glass is completely fogged over
3- 90%+ humidity inhibits evaporative cooling, but tanks I see have so much condensation, they're easily 95-99%!
4- my tank will stay at 85-90% without daily misting, maybe once every 36 hours and I have a 4x8" strip of fine mesh screen on top and a 40mm fan running all the time. How are people misting multiple times a day and keeping their tanks under 90%?
5- so I know constantly wet isn't good.... But my tank really doesn't have any standing water or anything. The leaf litter isn't drenched by any means. The background isn't soaked. If it's humid, is it okay if surfaces aren't overly wet?
6- I have 1 inkbird thermometer/hygrometer that stays in all the time and I have 1 govee thermometer/hygrometer that I drop in once every other day or so just to check the accuracy of my leave in monitoring equipment (both calibrated with 24hr salt test)
7- so why is it that my tank has PLENTY of ventilation with a large strip of mesh and a fan running all the time and it doesn't stay totally soaked but my humidity stays at 90% and I don't even mist every day?
8- will it harm the frogs I will be getting if I don't have tiny pools of water on the floor to get their skin wet or does the humidity in the tank absorb into their skin enough?
9- people have said "don't worry about humidity gauge, goo off look and smell" okay... Well, let's be real, I'm new and don't even have frogs yet 馃槀 how on earth do I know what a tank is supposed to look and smell like when it's at proper optimal humidity??? And for that matter, what IS proper humidity, I've read everything from low 70s to upper 90s is fine.
10- Temps I've read are totally fine in the 50s, but I've also read 70s is what they NEED to stay in.
11- I can't grow moss.... Well, I do have a little bit of spag that I'm growing out some string of turtles in that is coming back green.... But I bought some Java moss and that stuff dried up faster than anything. I'd think with 85-90% humidity it would be fine! Why no moss growth? Only moss death.
 

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1, 2, 3: lots of people take pictures right after misting their tanks, to get that "soaking wet" look. None of my tanks look like most people's pictures except right after it mists.

If I can get to my frog room in time tomorrow morning I'll take some pictures after my lights come on but before the misting happens to provide examples of how my tanks look before a misting.

I haven't ever actually measured the humidity in any of my tanks.

9. I try to have a range of moisture levels, from dry, fairly dry, damp, quite damp throughout the tank. I do this by pointing my mister nozzles at specific parts of the tank


10. Temperatures from low 60s to upper 70s are going to be fine for the frogs, provided that there aren't any rapid swings in temperature.

11. I don't grow any moss, so can't really help you, sorry.
 

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8- will it harm the frogs I will be getting if I don't have tiny pools of water on the floor to get their skin wet or does the humidity in the tank absorb into their skin enough?
No, and no.

The frogs don't need tiny pools of water, they need moist/wet areas to drink from through their belly patch. There are plenty of areas like this in every viv (well, every viv that is watered based on something other than humidity levels...), so you don't have to go out of your way to provide puddles. And no, humidity doesn't absorb into frogs' skin. They transpire just like we do, simply less so at higher RH and with less air movement/ventilation. They need to transpire, just like we do.

When it gets too dry in the air, I go put on some lotion, and the frogs go somewhere moist (there are scores of moist places in a viv, and the frogs know where every one of them is). When it gets too moist in the air, there's nothing I can do but suffer, and if I'm heat stressed, die; same with the frogs.

9- people have said "don't worry about humidity gauge, goo off look and smell" okay... Well, let's be real, I'm new and don't even have frogs yet 馃槀 how on earth do I know what a tank is supposed to look and smell like when it's at proper optimal humidity???

10- Temps I've read are totally fine in the 50s, but I've also read 70s is what they NEED to stay in.
I'd be interested to read where someone says "temps are totally fine in the 50s", where this means down to 50 and not something like "they probably won't die at 58", but keep in mind the difference between optimal range and tolerable excursions. Keeping darts (of all 'beginner' species) from 70-80F is safe and good. The higher end of the range might make frogs more active.

Excursions -- overnight, though maybe not every night for months, or for a few days during extreme situations like power loss -- down to 60F and up to 85 isn't too worrysome (given that the viv is set up properly, with adequate ventilation in the warm conditions, and large enough to allow for some thermal choice). Outside those extremes is, well, extreme.

Pushing thermal tolerance of any animal is not going to make caring for them more successful, hence the recommendation to keep them in the 70s.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
1, 2, 3: lots of people take pictures right after misting their tanks, to get that "soaking wet" look. None of my tanks look like most people's pictures except right after it mists.

If I can get to my frog room in time tomorrow morning I'll take some pictures after my lights come on but before the misting happens to provide examples of how my tanks look before a misting.

I haven't ever actually measured the humidity in any of my tanks.

9. I try to have a range of moisture levels, from dry, fairly dry, damp, quite damp throughout the tank. I do this by pointing my mister nozzles at specific parts of the tank


10. Temperatures from low 60s to upper 70s are going to be fine for the frogs, provided that there aren't any rapid swings in temperature.

11. I don't grow any moss, so can't really help you, sorry.
Thank you, pics would be super helpful!! I feel like I've got this paranoia of the tank being too dry because it looks dry, like my ghost wood and leaf litter doesn't look wet constantly, but I guess it's not supposed to... I think it's lack of frame of reference. I'm taking quite a while before adding the froggos to make sure it's right for them.

All your answers make me think I'm overthinking and they're pretty easy going critters 馃槀 but overthinking is sort of my style lol. Pics would be really helpful!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
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No, and no.

The frogs don't need tiny pools of water, they need moist/wet areas to drink from through their belly patch. There are plenty of areas like this in every viv (well, every viv that is watered based on something other than humidity levels...), so you don't have to go out of your way to provide puddles. And no, humidity doesn't absorb into frogs' skin. They transpire just like we do, simply less so at higher RH and with less air movement/ventilation. They need to transpire, just like we do.

When it gets too dry in the air, I go put on some lotion, and the frogs go somewhere moist (there are scores of moist places in a viv, and the frogs know where every one of them is). When it gets too moist in the air, there's nothing I can do but suffer, and if I'm heat stressed, die; same with the frogs.






I'd be interested to read where someone says "temps are totally fine in the 50s", where this means down to 50 and not something like "they probably won't die at 58", but keep in mind the difference between optimal range and tolerable excursions. Keeping darts (of all 'beginner' species) from 70-80F is safe and good. The higher end of the range might make frogs more active.

Excursions -- overnight, though maybe not every night for months, or for a few days during extreme situations like power loss -- down to 60F and up to 85 isn't too worrysome (given that the viv is set up properly, with adequate ventilation in the warm conditions, and large enough to allow for some thermal choice). Outside those extremes is, well, extreme.

Pushing thermal tolerance of any animal is not going to make caring for them more successful, hence the recommendation to keep them in the 70s.
Oh holy heck this was stinkin helpful. Thank you!!! I'll definitely refer back to this thread when the froggos arrive!! Happy to take the time to learn things like this first before getting them!

The down to 50s was a thread I read on here the other day actually. It was talking about winter weather and quite a few people seemed like they didn't worry at all in the mid 50s. I've already got my brain turning for what room will be best to move the tank into when cold weather hits & which room is small enough to heat up to nice toasty warm with a space heater running all winter. Because my house can get pretty cold sometimes. 50s didn't seem right to me. That's definitely why I ask. Maybe their frogs are surviving but not thriving at those Temps 馃
 
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