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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I set a tank up about a month ago. It sat cured for one week, then I added silicone and coco. It sat for another week just like that, then last week I had a fan on it all week. The silicon smell is long gone, but it still smells great stuff.

I didn't use a lot of GS, plus I made sure it was cured before moving forward. It had been dry for 2 weeks before I started lightly misting.

Any thoughts?

The smell is not strong, or alarming, but it is noticeable. I have 3 frogs that are waiting to go in the tank. Should I be worried or are they good to go?
 

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Do not put them in one tank of mine took 3 weeks for smell to leave. Keep airing it out and mist it down a bit and let it dry..

Sent from my SPH-D710 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Can you be more specific in as to my it is unsafe?

I can almost guarantee everything is cured, because I used suck a small, thin amount and let it dry for a week.
 

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The propellant is propane. This will have dissipated a long time ago. If there is a residual smell then you have a uncured zone. This could be due to the improperly mixed/shaken can before use, or it could be due to being insufficiently air cured due to the moisture in the air not being enough when it first began curing, or it could be an improperly mixed ratio/batch from the get go. Expired can, bad batch, who knows.

If it still gives off a detectable aroma there is uncured product. This will only be an issue however, if it is allowed to come into contact with water AND it is not one of the water cured proponents. (If it is the water will cure it.) If so it could get into your water and potentially cause issues.

Your call. I'd say a greater than 60% chance you'll be ok. Any uncured area is sealed over with cured product, and silicone. But there is always a chance.

I've had this happen a few times over the years (bad batches mostly)and as I sell my work, I can't risk it and had to toss it or use it as a display/experimentation tank. Just one of the unfortunate issues with mass produced single component polyurethane foams. I switched to a professional two part PUR foam system with better faster results, but its a LOT more temperamental and requires getting fully suited up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So how do I make sure it has all cured? I have such a small amount I'm not sure how part of it could not have cured, especially after a full week, plus the 2 weeks after with silicone.

What is the recommended fix?
 

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Did you black out the sides/back? If you didn't, you will probably be able to see the uncured part(s) from the outside. You could poke some holes to let some air get back there. Better yet, you could carve it out and re-do it...yeah that will suck but sometimes its better to play it safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Forget that, this is the second time I had to redo this tank for a 'smell' issue...

Ill poke holes in the whole damn thing...

If not, can someone provide actual facts that the gas smell would (not could) be toxic?
 

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If it still gives off a detectable aroma there is uncured product. This will only be an issue however, if it is allowed to come into contact with water AND it is not one of the water cured proponents. (If it is the water will cure it.) If so it could get into your water and potentially cause issues.

Your call. I'd say a greater than 60% chance you'll be ok. Any uncured area is sealed over with cured product, and silicone. But there is always a chance.
I'd say this sums up the answer you're searching for
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the additional clarification. Im going to point 2 fans down the vent hols that go to the drainage level for a bit and see if some air flow down under will help cure any GS that hasnt cured.\

Im also going to poke some holes all through the GS and see if I can get some air down to any uncured sections.

If this doesnt work, Im going to remove the plants and carve out some larger hole to search for uncured areas. (I can patch these up much easier, and cheaper, then a complete rebuild)

At this point if I cannot find anything I'll let it sit in the garage for a while While I wait.

If then nothing, I will probably break something around the house, swear a bit, and rebuild the thing.

F
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have a black can as well, but didn't use it on this particular project. Its possible the one I used is expired or has gone bad with age...
 

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Here is something. Did you make this in your garage? What temperature and humidity did you use it in? I see you live in Utah and I imagine its a lot colder than here. I live in San Antonio, Texas and I build vivs year around (part-time). THE single biggest issue I've noticed regarding the proper cure of the literally 100's of different materials I've worked with, designed, and experimented with, is the ambient temperature/humidity. I live/work at night just to combat this single issue as the only time temperatures ever stabilize around here is from about 10pm-5am during the summer. During the winter I keep the garage closed and use heaters.

Possible reasons you are having issues with this:

1. Your temperature/humidity levels are not in the appropriate ranges for the foam to cure. The fastest cure I've ever had with GS foam was in a rainstorm in Hawaii. 100% humidity, 85F. Full cure in less than 20 minutes. (I was using it as a mother-molding material for some molds I was taking off banyan tree roots.)

The colder the temperature and less moisture in the air, the less C02 is produced and less expansion you get, resulting in a higher density foam and an sort of pudding/frothy/melted ice-cream look.

The problem this can cause is that if the amount of moisture that comes in contact with the material is not enough by the time the outer layer skins, the areas underneath do not have enough moisture to fully react. Adding to that the skin prevents almost all air/water movement.
This is dramatically exacerbated if coupled with spraying large volumes as this creates deeper areas.

2. The cans you are buying are bad. The batch/source/handling/shipping whatever is not correct. One of the biggest issues with polymers in general is their freeze/thaw stability. Some are no longer stable or in the same configuration after a freezing event. Sometimes its just as simple as shaking the can to mix it again, but other times it has permanently deteriorated the polymer. PUR foam, I think is one of the later, but as you are seeing at least partial cures, this could be ruled out to a point.

3. User error. You are not shaking the cans for 2-3 minutes like they say and/or you are using too large of volumes for the ambient conditions to allow for.

4. Your sense of smell is 50-100X greater than the rest of us.

My guess is its too cold, too dry, and you are using too much at a time. Also check the expiration dates of each can EVERY time. This is a HUGE issue with GE silicone too.

As for the GAS being toxic I've got varying degrees of agreement with that. An animal in contact with air that has that gas in it will likely not kill/damage it. Too dilute. However what the gas originates from, could be an issue IF it is allowed to come in contact with water and THEN that water comes into contact with the animal. Assuming it is not a water-cured material that would become inert after reacting with the water.

One fix you can try is soaking the crud out of the thing with a hose. Poking holes will help.
 
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