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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

I am interested in taking pictures of some springtails that I've found. I think I've seen some info at the collembola site, but their site is currently down.

I know some of you are the EXPERT in taking pictures from a small object. So I was wondering if you could give me a suggestion if I want to take pictures of an object, about the size of this guy's eye :shock: maybe a bit smaller.

SB
 

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I think you will need more of a microscope with a camera hook up for that. They are very small. There are some lenses that can do 1:5 but they run around $1200.

steelcube said:
Hi guys,

I am interested in taking pictures of some springtails that I've found. I think I've seen some info at the collembola site, but their site is currently down.

I know some of you are the EXPERT in taking pictures from a small object. So I was wondering if you could give me a suggestion if I want to take pictures of an object, about the size of this guy's eye :shock: maybe a bit smaller.

SB
 

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Hi SB,

Do you have a camera currently? If so, what make/model and what lenses and tele converters if any do you have..

There are options out there.

A shot of a guy's eye - I will assume you are talking about a humna eye, in shich case you need something that will focus to a 1:1 magnification (lifesize). Most current macros will do this.

However, if you are talking about a frog's eye, then you are going beyond 1:1 (lifesize magnification). In this case, there are a few options. One is to go with a specialized macro lens. Canon makes one, and it retails for around $900. It will fit EOS bodies and will require a relatively powerful external flash for decent photos. Depending on which body you use, you can get magnification of 1:1 all the way to 5:1 (5X lifesize) if you use a film or 1Ds (digital, full frame). If you are using one of the other digitals, you can get up to 8:1 (8X lifesize) - due to the crop factor of the CCD / CMOS sensors.

Alternatively, you can get a microscope that has the capacity to mount a film/digital camera to it. There are also microscopes that have a digital capture feature built in to it. Good quality microscopes cost good money though and normally have hot lights (alwways on), so flash photograhy is more difficult, requiring more specialized equipment. It is definitely possible, but shooting live, moving subjects with a mocroscope is a huge challenge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have a canon elan II w/ sigma macro/zoom 28-80mm. I think my lens is broken though, so I was sort of looking for a replacement that would work to take the picture.

About the guy's eye, I meant the icon eye :shock: ... it about the size of this -> o <- actually.

***edited from what could be misinterpreted***

SB
 

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If that is how small you will want to get, then I think the EF 65mm 1x-5x may be the most affordable option. Even at these magnifications, that might not quite get just the little icons eye in the frame. I may be getting this lens for work (not surte yet) so I will let you know.

I have been searching for a place that rents one, but have been unable to find one. It is hard enough trying to find a shop with one in stock - there was a shipment recently, but a few months ago none to be had.

Actually there is another alternative - some used film equipment. There are lots of bellows units and also bellows lenses that will give you that magnification. Of course, going down to that level of magnification requires a lot of work. It can be painstaking. I used to own a bellows unit and tried my hand at insect photography, though bigger than a full frame springtail photo. You can get great shots - no doubt - but it is work.

Olympus probably has the most to offer in terms of this type of specialised macro gear, but it is out of production and you have to beat the bushes to find it. Marvelous equipment though. Canon, Minolta and Nikon also have bellows units as well as bellows lenses. There are some non brand name makers of macro gear that will also work. Let me know if you want more info on the used film options.

Yuri
 
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