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I wired an old pc fan i found to a cell charger and after about 20 mins i noticed the charger was getting a little to warm for my liking. I dont want to risk a fire so i unplugged it. I dont think its normal. its a 12v fan on a 5v charger. Any suggestions?
 

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Ok will do. I make my way to radio shack and look for one of those variable ones. Can i daisy chain two fans off the same power source say 2- 12v .19amp off, say a 12v .5 amp charger?
Yes you can. Just make sure the power adaptor, or power converter, has a higher amp output than your all of your fans amp draw added together. So your 2 - .19amp fans require at least a .38 amp converter. Of course they don't make them that specific (.38 amp) so you step up to the .5 amp. 500 mah or milliamp is the same as .5 amp.
This will run you $20 buck or more at Radio Shack. I know, I just priced them out a month ago. Or you can ebay it. Here is one for half that at $9.50 shipped. UNIVERSAL AC DC ADAPTER 1.5V 3V 4.5V 6V 9V 12V 500mA 6P | eBay
And for future use, after that auction closes, this is the seller. He always has a variety of them. eBay My World - ebbid1
 

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Also look around the house for your bin of random old electronics. Maybe an old cordless phone, computer speakers, etc. Pretty much anything with a "wall wart" will do the trick as long as its rated for 12v and the amps is greater then the combination of your fans.
 

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yep. you should allow a minimum of 10% more amperage on the power source than will be drawn by the components. varying the voltage output will only speed up or slow down the fans. the higher the voltage the higher the RPMs. (dont exceed the manufacturers recommended voltage this can cause your unit to fail)

and as soon as some parts come in i'll be doing an in-depth how to video on making a fan system from scratch.

james
 

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yep. you should allow a minimum of 10% more amperage on the power source than will be drawn by the components. varying the voltage output will only speed up or slow down the fans. the higher the voltage the higher the RPMs. (dont exceed the manufacturers recommended voltage this can cause your unit to fail)

and as soon as some parts come in i'll be doing an in-depth how to video on making a fan system from scratch.

james
The extra 10 % is good to know, James. I imagine that is for the initial start up draw?
 

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The extra 10 % is good to know, James. I imagine that is for the initial start up draw?
The 10% is just a safety margin. If the wall wart and fan are both produced with a +/-5% margin in the specs you need a little wiggle room to take that into account.
Doug
 

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yep. you should allow a minimum of 10% more amperage on the power source than will be drawn by the components. varying the voltage output will only speed up or slow down the fans. the higher the voltage the higher the RPMs. (dont exceed the manufacturers recommended voltage this can cause your unit to fail)

and as soon as some parts come in i'll be doing an in-depth how to video on making a fan system from scratch.

james
james67.wmv - YouTube
 
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