Dendroboard banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,985 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My surinam cobalt is about 4-5 months out of the water. I bought him two months ago. He is very healthy. He is very fat and is growing constantly. He lives in a naturalistic 20 gallon high vivarium complete with drip walls, live plants, java moss along the back panel, twin tube lighting, correct photoperiod, temperature at 76-81 degrees. The humidity is also 70-85%. He has plenty of places to hang out in, particularly in the back.

Unfortunately, he spends most of his time hiding in the back against the marantha plant and dumbcane. Its either that or down in a corner of the rabbit foot fern's pot. I rarely ever see him out in the open in the front of the tank. Sometimes I think he's escaped, but then I find him coming out at random from the leaves at feeding time, nearly scaring the SH*T out of me when he pops out.

I assume its just because he's a juvenile and will get bold as he grows up. I really enjoy him, as he's so cute, but I don't really get a good chance to see his cuteness. But I will lose my interest in dendrobates if I don't get any action sometime. Any help will be appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts
Is it the only one in the tank? You might want to try getting another one so he has a pal to coax him out more often. Maybe even two more. With luck you might end up with a pair.
Hope this helps
ADAM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,985 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
yes, he's/she's single right now

Yes, Kole (may be a Jean) is unsexed and alone. I know dendrobates are fairly social, but I didn't want to take the risk of two females together in a tank as small as a 20 gallon high. I originally planned on maybe putting E. tricolor in there, and may decide to divide the tank in half with an inexpensive aquarium divider and keep Kole by him/herself. Perhaps I could do a little redecorating? Move the plants out more into the middle or front to coax him? He's not stressed at all, considering how much he consumes and his growth rate, just very introverted.

Anyway, there are a lot of tall, bushy plants as I orignally, and still waiting for E. tricolor moraspunga. And I know this is semi arboreal style. I know he does pick the same spots everytime. Every night, he goes down the same crack and tucks himself in, with just the yellow on his eyebrows. Its so adorable, it makes you want to vomit.
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
shy tinc

It may just be a matter of time. I think that most frogs become bolder as they become more accustomed to their environment. I remember having one New River tinc that was shy and somewhat reluctant to eat as a froglet. It was about 6 months before I saw him eating on a regular basis. At 14 months, he's a whomping 2 inches and eating me out of house and home. I also have an auratus which has been shy since day one but I believe that he/she has become LESS SHY over time.

Ken
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
The first 6-8 months I had a lone d. tinc powder blue she hid about 80% of the time. Then, one day, she just seemed to understand that nothing was out to get her.

Then, she got a mate and now – she’s all over the place. She chases him like mad!! So much that she sprained her arm, and had to go to the shoebox “hospital” to recover. Then, once retuned to her tank and mate, was back all over him. Poor fella! :wink:

Oh, I do have another lone female (d. tinc ole marie – “Ollie”) who’s about 1 yr. She hid the first 6 months I had her. Now she’s all over the place and getting too fat & sassy. Bold as can be, and seems to be everyone who visits favorite frog. (I need a male for her, I think.)

I think your assumption is correct and boldness will come. Give your baby some more time. Soon they’ll be all over the place!
 
G

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
I agree with all the theories. Some frogs even with mates are just shy doesn't matter the species however I would say some species are statistically more shyor more bold. I also agree that having a mate makes some frogs more bold. I have even seen that some behaviors make them more bold. I've had frogs that run from the mist bottle then I started feeding them then misting them now they are less shy. I still have an auratus that will hide if you even look at her while the male is super bold. It just depends as long as they are eating I wouldn't worry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,985 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
thanks!

Thanks a bunch! That helps a lot. I was recommended by an advanced hobbyist that another reason is that he's getting TOO fat. He says that he often notices, and I have too, that the frogs seem to have a routine of napping, being less active, and very active. My tinc eats a HUGE amount everyday, perhaps too much. He ate even more when he was still in the critter keeper, TWO big feedings a day. So, and I have known this from keeping other anurans, that obese frogs tend to be more lazy. Kole naps a lot in his favorite spots, even goes to bed a little early in his crevice every night. So, if I cut back on portion, that might tempt him to come out in the open some more. I also will keep the other suggestions on this post in mind. thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
561 Posts
I have a male cobolt that is just over 3 years old and hides 90% of the
time. My established vivaria are pretty heavily planted and he is often very hard to find, despite the fact that he is a pretty large tinc. The funny thing is that he usually comes out when I have the enclosure open, for feeding, cleaning, plant maintenance so I would not say that he is shy....
he just likes to hide. I got a girlfriend for him in quarantine right now,
but I still think he will keep out of sight a lot. He is healthy and happy (I hope) so I do not worry too much about not seeing him.

Ed
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top