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Qty 2 - Dendrobates tinctorius 'Green Sipaliwini'.
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Our frogs are about 16 months old and are kept in a bioactive vivarium. We left for 10 days and had a family member coming by daily to feed and check on temp/humidity. When we got back, I noticed one of the two has a couple white spots on the head. No other discernable marks or odd behavior is apparent. I'm not sure if the frog bumped it's head or this is something more serious. We turned the humidity down based on some other posts and haven't seen any changes over 2 days. Photos are attached from Saturday (Right photo) when we spotted it and update today (left photo).
20210308_114204-COLLAGE~2.jpg


Looking for some guidance on how we should react. I have no problem going to a specialty vet, but figured I'd start here to see if we're just being hypersensitive.
 

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Dendrobates Tinctorus “Azureus”, Epipedobates Anthonyi “Santa Isabel”, and also myself.
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Our frogs are about 16 months old and are kept in a bioactive vivarium. We left for 10 days and had a family member coming by daily to feed and check on temp/humidity. When we got back, I noticed one of the two has a couple white spots on the head. No other discernable marks or odd behavior is apparent. I'm not sure if the frog bumped it's head or this is something more serious. We turned the humidity down based on some other posts and haven't seen any changes over 2 days. Photos are attached from Saturday (Right photo) when we spotted it and update today (left photo). View attachment 297916

Looking for some guidance on how we should react. I have no problem going to a specialty vet, but figured I'd start here to see if we're just being hypersensitive.
That doesn’t look good. I would take him to a vet. I’m pretty sure he took a hit and now has an infection. Whatever it is, I would look for a vet.
 

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Qty 2 - Dendrobates tinctorius 'Green Sipaliwini'.
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That doesn’t look good. I would take him to a vet. I’m pretty sure he took a hit and now has an infection. Whatever it is, I would look for a vet.
Forgive my ignorance, but if we did take her (guessing due to small toe pads) to a vet, what treatment would we be looking at? If it is a skin infection is that typically treated with a topical ointment?
 

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Forgive my ignorance, but if we did take her (guessing due to small toe pads) to a vet, what treatment would we be looking at? If it is a skin infection is that typically treated with a topical ointment?
Yes, the best ointment that you could use is silver sulfadiazine.

Also, I would say that this is a bacterial infection but it could also a fungal or parasitic. Just keep an eye on the frog.
 

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I agree that a visit with a qualified exotics vet should happen ASAP.

You can search for a nearby ARAV vet here.

Edit to add: it might be worthwhile to provide pics and further details of the whole viv, and descriptions of viv parameters, feeding and supplementing schedules, etc. Your comments about 'turning down' and 'checking on' temp and humidity suggest that yours is an actively controlled viv, which can sometimes be made simpler and therefore safer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Oy.. So I called around and talked to some of the folks listed on ARAV and next appointments are 2-3 weeks from now unless I am willing to pay extra for emergency fees (again, willing to do what it takes to protect the little guys, but money is tight if it's not emergency).

I know nobody here is giving me a veterinary diagnosis and care plan, but do y'all think they can wait 2-3 weeks? Should I do something in the interim? Or do I just shell out the cash and move fast. I attached some more photos.
IMG_20210308_140520.jpg
IMG_20210308_120823.jpg
IMG_20210308_140502.jpg
 

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Oy.. So I called around and talked to some of the folks listed on ARAV and next appointments are 2-3 weeks from now unless I am willing to pay extra for emergency fees (again, willing to do what it takes to protect the little guys, but money is tight if it's not emergency).

I know nobody here is giving me a veterinary diagnosis and care plan, but do y'all think they can wait 2-3 weeks? Should I do something in the interim? Or do I just shell out the cash and move fast. I attached some more photos. View attachment 297921 View attachment 297923 View attachment 297924
With silver sulfadiazine, I could see you keeping it well for a week or two but after that time span, you need to get it to a vet ASAP.

I would say that you should get there immediately but I understand you’re low on money. I think we’ve all been there.
 

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That's only Rx, and if there is a work-around I would be interested in learning it.
Hmmm....

I’ve personally never have had to use the cream but I’m wondering if you can’t just buy it from your local Walmart.
297928

I’m not sure if it has “stuff” in it though that can be harmful.

If you can’t, may I suggest Neosporin without pain-reliever?
 

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If you are confident to do so, a gentle, stable, increase in temperature and decrease in overall humidity is a compatible ambient with healing

This means observant, careful handmisting. Which can be uncompatible with Plant Needs

Its a quandary deciding between a smaller temp controlled H env, and finessing the environment they are habituated to living in.

I would as steward, check interior refugia sites for adverse contacts.
 

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Try this one.

 

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If you are confident to do so, a gentle, stable, increase in temperature and decrease in overall humidity is a compatible ambient with healing

This means observant, careful handmisting. Which can be uncompatible with Plant Needs

Its a quandary deciding between a smaller temp controlled H env, and finessing the environment they are habituated to living in.

I would as steward, check interior refugia sites for adverse contacts.
I would do exactly as Kmc says. Drying out slightly is a good aid to keep infections down. But during this process watch them closely. If they eat a ton but still losing weight, I would say parasites. If they don't eat much at all, likely bacteria or fungal. There is not much we can recommend for now other than a vet. But if you follow this process you will be better off than if you had done nothing.
 
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