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First question is which do you think looks better, and second is where can i get the cheapest sources for them?

Thks
Ryan
 

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I'm not sure about sheet moss, but i purchased some pillow moss from T&C and I like it a lot. Its really green and seems pretty hardy. I have chunks of it in the shoeboxes i keep my froglets in, and all i'm doing is misting it and it seems to be holding up great.
 

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I had both and I prefer the sheet moss. they seem to last much longer for me. Mine was from Black Jungle the tropical moss.
 
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moss...

i have been using cushion and pillow as well as haircap and rock cap depending on the location it will be placed in the vivarium - the light and water needs are differnt. like haircap, i use that nearer the streams and cushion in cracks or rocky areas. i have moss if your intersted.
 

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I have never had much luck with sheet moss, and pillow moss frogs ok. My new favorite ground cover is leaf litter. The frogs just seem to love it.

Ryan said:
First question is which do you think looks better, and second is where can i get the cheapest sources for them?

Thks
Ryan
 

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see, my problem is that i don't know where to get the stupid leaves for a leaf litter floor. What kind of leaves should be used and how do you get them?
 

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I bought some at IAD, I forget from who, maybe Mellisa will see this I think she may know who they were from.

I hear oak leaves are good and magnolia leaves. If you have some woods that you know are clean go grab some. I live in the city, and have not had a chance to go look for some so I just bought a few bags. Should last me a long time. I do hope to find some more soon as I hear they are also good to use in with the tadpoles.

mindcrash said:
see, my problem is that i don't know where to get the stupid leaves for a leaf litter floor. What kind of leaves should be used and how do you get them?
 

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I live in the city as well so not many forests around. I could run up to the mountains, but i'm doubtful that there would be many oak or magnolia trees.

Melissa: if you could shed any light on where to get some leaf litter that would be awesome.

Thanks!
 

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You may also want to do a search someone was selling some here awhile back I thought. Also might want to post in the wanted section. I know there are a number of people that could help you out.

mindcrash said:
I live in the city as well so not many forests around. I could run up to the mountains, but i'm doubtful that there would be many oak or magnolia trees.

Melissa: if you could shed any light on where to get some leaf litter that would be awesome.

Thanks!
 
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kyle, i dont know where in the city you live, but there are oak trees by the hundred in this town. go into clintonville (north columbus) and take a walk. most of the streets are lined with oak trees. i am pretty sure that no one will mind you taking leaves from their yard. plus, this is a good time to collect as the oaks are finally dropping their leaves. as a matter of fact, if you want to bring a rake and a bag over to my house, you can clean them all up for me =)
 
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off topic - leaf litter...

mindcrash said:
see, my problem is that i don't know where to get the stupid leaves for a leaf litter floor. What kind of leaves should be used and how do you get them?
oak leaves are good. collect them and wash well in case of bug and chemicals.
 

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I know, but everyone sprays their yard, and I would not that stuff in my tanks. Heck if that was the case my brother owns a lawncare buisness a bit north and I could get trucklaods of it. :)

I rather get them out in the country where they have not been sprayed or anything like that.

drunknmunky said:
kyle, i dont know where in the city you live, but there are oak trees by the hundred in this town. go into clintonville (north columbus) and take a walk. most of the streets are lined with oak trees. i am pretty sure that no one will mind you taking leaves from their yard. plus, this is a good time to collect as the oaks are finally dropping their leaves. as a matter of fact, if you want to bring a rake and a bag over to my house, you can clean them all up for me =)
 
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I had my sister-in-law send me some magnolia leaves from Missouri because I haven't found a mag.tree here in Iowa.I collected a bunch of white oak leaves from the place I hunted last fall.What amount are you guys looking for?I collected them about in the middle of a 315 public area.I think I have about 1 garbage bag full of them.I would trade some for plants.
Mark W.
 

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i'm looking for something along the lines of a grocery bag full...but i don't have any plants to trade unless your looking for pothos :lol:
 
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leaf litter to moss....LOL

this is a brief on the moss i have been using with good success and bad. light, soil pH, sand content, and more taken into concideration will help the moss grow better. it depends though on the type of moss. Hope this helps

Fern Moss (Thuidium): A versatile, low growing moss with a high transplant success rate. Thuidium thrives in shade, but will also tolerate dappled or morning sunlight (not direct afternoon sun). The color is medium green. This moss is available by the square or cubic foot - see order form for details. This is our most versatile moss, and the easiest to work with

Rock Cap Moss (Dicranum): Typically found growing atop rocks and boulders in the wild, this dense, medium to dark green moss transplants fairly well into shady areas onto rocks and in many locations, soil. This moss is offered by the clump or cubic foot.

Haircap Moss (Polytrichum): Haircap moss has soil anchoring structures that closely resemble and function like roots. For this reason, we ship this species in clumps with a small amount of soil still attached. Haircap Moss prefers medium shade to partial sun, and likes a well drained soil.

Cushion Moss (Leucobryum): Prefers sandy soil, likes shade, but can tolerate partial sun. This moss is a lighter green color with a silvery-white cast to it. It grows in a round cushion shape, and is shipped in clumps.
 

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i know this is not the best thing, but is seems to work fine for me, i just use almost any small coars leaves i find in my backyard washed off, after a wile they decompose and turn into plant food then i just put in more, you can get very large leaves of some nut tree (i cant remember what!)at black jungle, they have not put them on the website though, i got mine form IAD, i was about to but one of thoughs big bags of oak but did not have time, the new trend seems to be switching from moss to leaves, im glad,i think leaves give the dart frogs a sense of security, mt aer always clinbing in them, i usaly us a combo of moss and leaves
 
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