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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here are pictures of 2 of my 3 Oyapocks. They are approximately 14 months oow. These were purchased as a probable pair (2 of one sex and one of the other; not saying what the ratio was so as not to influence your answers). I am pretty sure on the sex of the 3rd one (hence no pictures). But, these two have some mixed indications to me. So what do you say?

I know the images are poor, but all I have right now is my blackberry.

There are 3 pictures of each. The first 3 are of one Oyapock and the second set of 3 are of the other.

Frog Poison dart frog Amphibian Phyllobates Toad


Frog Cobalt blue Poison dart frog Blue Amphibian


Blue Cobalt blue Organism Poison dart frog Electric blue


Frog Poison dart frog Amphibian Toad Organism


Poison dart frog Frog Amphibian Cobalt blue Organism


Poison dart frog Frog Amphibian Terrestrial animal Phyllobates
 

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I think you have a male and female but it's hard to tell with pic Males will develop larger, heart-shaped toe pads on their front digits and spread their toes wider. Among frogs of the same age and species, males are a little bit shorter in length and slimmer than their female cunterparts. Females are longer and rounder. Males call. Look for throat movement . Keep in mind that development rates vary in frogs.

If they are housed together, try separating them. I have found the male will sing within 15 min.

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I am aware of the signs for sexing them. The problem I am having is there are mixed signals. The first one has larger toe pads, but has the more angle shaped back. The bottom one has smaller toe pads, but does not have the angled back. Hence body shapes are leaning one way but toe pads seem to indicate the other. So I thought I would ask some pros out there what they thought.
 

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I am aware of the signs for sexing them. The problem I am having is there are mixed signals. The first one has larger toe pads, but has the more angle shaped back. The bottom one has smaller toe pads, but does not have the angled back. Hence body shapes are leaning one way but toe pads seem to indicate the other. So I thought I would ask some pros out there what they thought.
Sorry, I didn't mean to imply that you didn't know. It's just that the pictures in that tutorial make it soooo easy to see. I have it bookmarked for my own reference.
 

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I agree with most that the first is male. In addition to toe pad sexual dimorphism, oyapoks also show differences in the amount of white coloration on their feet and body. Males tend to have a bit more white than females.

I am unsure on the second frog. I am leaning more towards female; however, I am not certain.
 

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I agree with most that the first is male. In addition to toe pad sexual dimorphism, oyapoks also show differences in the amount of white coloration on their feet and body. Males tend to have a bit more white than females.

I am unsure on the second frog. I am leaning more towards female; however, I am not certain.
i almost said something about this, but i didnt want to give away any trade secrets ;)

male oyapocks IME are noticeably more white than females. while its not a science its worked pretty well for me.

james
 
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