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I'm interested in thoughts/opinions on how many different bugs you use to seed your vivs.

Do you throw in a little bit of everything? Springtails and then some of all the different woodlice - dwarf whites, greys, striped, oranges, purples.

Will all the different species of woodlice coexist? Or will one eventually come out a winner?

Do the woodlice all pretty much perform the same function so there's no need for several varieties in one viv?

THANKS!!!
 

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In my opinion, variety is the spice of life. I like to throw in a bit of everything. I'm going to cite my Solarte tank as an example as it is the viv I began seeding with, the earliest. I put temperate springs, pink springs, and Tomocerus giant black springs in. The pinks seem to get the best foothold and are plentiful in there. I don't see too many temperate springs in there even though I add them often. We do still see adult tomocerus around. They must have a good foothold as they are more secretive and harder to see on a dark substrate, yet we still find them. Eventually I seeded with both Dwarf White and Dwarf Gray Isopods. We see the whites in the top layers of the substrate along the glass edge, and this is just looking from outside the viv. We can see the more active grays crawling around on the ghostwood, broms, and sides of the viv. If you grab a handful of leaf litter from anywhere in the viv, springtails hop and scatter, and we find both white and gray isopods. So they are both breeding and living together fine so far. We did add Oranges about 2 months ago but it's a little early to say how they will shake things up.
I think that the isopods tend to migrate to and claim as their own, different niches in the viv. Whites like it moister and are in and on the top surface of substrate and deep in the leaf litter. Plus they are slow and easy pikkins for my Solarte froglets. The Grays seem to like it just a wee bit dryer so are seen in the open much more, possibly using the leaf litter as their primary breeding grounds? They are more active, and give my frogs a bit of sport in "the hunt". The oranges I see up and about more than the others.
In summary, in my limited experience, the isopods seem to do well together, possibly more so than springtails.
 
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Thanks for the info doug. I also like to put several different types of isos and springs in my viv, keeps my frogs active and i don't get the musk smell that i was getting before i added the microfauna to my tanks.:D


In my opinion, variety is the spice of life. I like to throw in a bit of everything. I'm going to cite my Solarte tank as an example as it is the viv I began seeding with, the earliest. I put temperate springs, pink springs, and Tomocerus giant black springs in. The pinks seem to get the best foothold and are plentiful in there. I don't see too many temperate springs in there even though I add them often. We do still see adult tomocerus around. They must have a good foothold as they are more secretive and harder to see on a dark substrate, yet we still find them. Eventually I seeded with both Dwarf White and Dwarf Gray Isopods. We see the whites in the top layers of the substrate along the glass edge, and this is just looking from outside the viv. We can see the more active grays crawling around on the ghostwood, broms, and sides of the viv. If you grab a handful of leaf litter from anywhere in the viv, springtails hop and scatter, and we find both white and gray isopods. So they are both breeding and living together fine so far. We did add Oranges about 2 months ago but it's a little early to say how they will shake things up.
I think that the isopods tend to migrate to and claim as their own, different niches in the viv. Whites like it moister and are in and on the top surface of substrate and deep in the leaf litter. Plus they are slow and easy pikkins for my Solarte froglets. The Grays seem to like it just a wee bit dryer so are seen in the open much more, possibly using the leaf litter as their primary breeding grounds? They are more active, and give my frogs a bit of sport in "the hunt". The oranges I see up and about more than the others.
In summary, in my limited experience, the isopods seem to do well together, possibly more so than springtails.
 
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