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Can I keep a rough skinned newt with a group of 2-3 firebellied toads in a 10 gallon? Its about half water/half land...I've heard that those newts are poisonous..

Thanks,
Dustin
 

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I think you answered your own question.

Also why shove that many animals in such a small tank?

Can I keep a rough skinned newt with a group of 2-3 firebellied toads in a 10 gallon? Its about half water/half land...I've heard that those newts are poisonous..

Thanks,
Dustin
 

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rough skinned newts produce tetrodotoxin, like pufferfish. Probably not going to hurt your fbt's but thats a lot of animals in a 10 gallon tank. Better to just let it go back into the wild where you got it
 

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Can I keep a rough skinned newt with a group of 2-3 firebellied toads in a 10 gallon? Its about half water/half land...I've heard that those newts are poisonous..

Thanks,
Dustin
I have kept a rough skinned newt with a couple of firebellied toads. The newt lived with me for 11 years and the toads lived with me for about 13 years.

The ten gallon tank is the problem to me. That is pretty small for the animals.

Actually both animals have the ability to have some toxicity. Also the newt will likely try to nibble on a toad's leg once in a while, but mine tended to work things out. I fed my newts earth worms and pieces of night crawler while the toads wanted / needed bugs, crickets, etc.
 

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rough skinned newts produce tetrodotoxin, like pufferfish. Probably not going to hurt your fbt's but thats a lot of animals in a 10 gallon tank. Better to just let it go back into the wild where you got it
Wrong side of the country ;) Rough skinned newts are west coast. There is another species (I forget the name) that looks very similar and is much less toxic, also don't remember its native range. If you get one at a pet store don't release it into the wild, especially outside its native range.

10 gal is way to small IMO for that many animals, and mixing just compounds the problem. Fire bellied toads are very active if given the space, I'd say 2 in a 10gal with no other animals max, but really even though they are cheap they'd probably do better in 15-20gal+ for 2-3.

I had one with a paddle tail newt for years. The newt was fully aquatic, the toad was about 50/50 never had a problem with one bothering the other much. I think the newt might have grabbed the frog's leg once but rapidly let go and I don't remember a repeat incident, no injury either. Still though that was when I was more noobish and it was also a 46gal tank so I don't really recommend mixing especially if you are new and/or using a small tank.

Its may be possible that one animal could poison the other. I've always heard that it could/can happen, but never actually heard of it happening. More theory then fact in my experience but I haven't done a ton of research looking for specific cases. But I think the toxins are different so it could be a very real risk. The rough skin has Tetrodotoxin and I found this info on the bombina...
Lewis' dictionary of toxicology - Google Books

Probably better safe then sorry. I got away with it and I'm sure many do but still if I was going to do it over again now that I'm more experienced...well I wouldn't do it ;)

Here is the classic frog eats newt (rough skin newt I believe) video just for fun...

 

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Woops, didnt notice his location. I assumed that the rough skinned newt was wild collected. Didnt think people bred them in captivity. Maybe a wild collected specimin from the PNW, offered via kingsnake Im guessing
Great video. That bullfrog deserved it! Damn invasive species.
 

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Woops, didnt notice his location. I assumed that the rough skinned newt was wild collected. Didnt think people bred them in captivity. Maybe a wild collected specimin from the PNW, offered via kingsnake Im guessing
Great video. That bullfrog deserved it! Damn invasive species.
I'm not sure if much CB breeding takes place, I assume they are mostly WC from big wholesalers. But the true rough skins and the look a likes both end up in the pet stores from time to time. I think the first newt I ever owned was one of these. I know I've had 1 or 2 over the years. Was never sure if it was the true rough skin or the look a like. Even then I was smart enough not to put it in my mouth :)

A lot of toxic animals kill the animal that eats them but the fact the newt walks out of the mouth and goes on his way is pretty rad.
 

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1) Everyone agrees the tank is a bit small--try a 15 or 20 long.

2) People do successfully keep some Asian newt species with Bombina toads. In my opinion, Japanese Cynops are hardier than Chinese Cynops. The bigger Paramesotriton sp. can work with Bombinas in a bigger tank.

Do you have DesVosjoli's book, Popular Amphibians? Good discussions of tank setups and mixing species.
 

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I remember severasl kids dying where I lived when I was young from being dared to lick the rough skinned newts. We lived on a golf course when I was little, and had mass migrations of rough skinned newts out of the woods and into the course ponds in mid march. Pretty awesome stuff to see. 1000s of them crossing the roads on rainy nights for about a 2 week period every year. I caught plenty of them, but never kept any for long.
 

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I'm not sure if much CB breeding takes place, I assume they are mostly WC from big wholesalers. But the true rough skins and the look a likes both end up in the pet stores from time to time. I think the first newt I ever owned was one of these. I know I've had 1 or 2 over the years. Was never sure if it was the true rough skin or the look a like. Even then I was smart enough not to put it in my mouth :)

A lot of toxic animals kill the animal that eats them but the fact the newt walks out of the mouth and goes on his way is pretty rad.

There are some people that produce this species.. but I doubt they are selling to the pet stores or wholesalers.
 

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I remember severasl kids dying where I lived when I was young from being dared to lick the rough skinned newts. We lived on a golf course when I was little, and had mass migrations of rough skinned newts out of the woods and into the course ponds in mid march. Pretty awesome stuff to see. 1000s of them crossing the roads on rainy nights for about a 2 week period every year. I caught plenty of them, but never kept any for long.
The newts are kind of a cool critter. The ones I had were wild caught, they are very plentiful in the lakes around here. They are a fisherman's bane as they will steal worms and night crawlers bait all day long. A year or two ago there was an article in the local paper about some folks who died when a newt made its way into the coffee pot, which when heated in the morning caused the newt to expire and express it's toxins. The coffee became very lethal.

Both the newts and the firebelly toads can be handled without any real concern as long as you don't hurt them or subject them to the feeling that they are going to die. That is when they will "express" themselves in a most toxic way.
 

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yeah, I used to hold the newts all the time, but I had a dad who taught me the right way to handle them when I was very little, and he made absolutely sure never put one in my mouth, and always wshed my hands as soon as I was done handlling them. Their defense posture is pretty awesome.
 

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Why even risk the aniamls health by mixing two toxic aniamls. I have a lot of newts in my collection and I would advise keeping the toads seperate. I have seen agressive toads attack newts when they surface and try to wrestle them. Also the newts if large enough can break a toads leg if they get a good bite on the foot. I have seen this when I made the mistake new to the hobby. When the toad goes to jump the natural instict for the newt is to thrust its head in a ripping motion, so if the foot is in its mouth when all this happens you might be able to guess what it will look like after. If you aren't going to listen make sure you have a large tank. Around 40 gallons so your wter quality doesn't go bad as fast and you must have a good filter. If you offer plenty of hiding areas for the newt under water and keep its belly full, it may not bother the frogs. But again, why risk it?
 

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Re: Firebellied newts

I have a question...I have just aquired fire bellied newts and two of them have white little things crawling on them. I am thinking mites. How do I get rid of them? Thanks, Laura1611
 

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PLEASE post a photo before assuming they are mites. I have never heard of mites on newts.

Have you tried rinsing the newts in cool water?
 

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I guess we can break this down a little...

are the newts aquatic or terrestrial right now? If aquatic are you seeing small white things on the glass? If so then you have copepods in the tank (very common).

If the newts are terrestrial are you seeing small white things running the suubstrate? If so then you have either springtails or detrivore mites.. Both tend to be harmless although too high of a population can stress some animals due to constant contact.

How warm are you keeping the newts? Fire belly newts should be kept pretty cool (ideally close to 65F) for best chances to adapt to captivity.
 
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