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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Everyone,

Been searching for a RO filter system to use with my mistking but most of the threads I have found are several years old or don't have many suggestions. What are some of you using and would you recommend the filter.

I am looking to spend between 100 - 150 if possible and don't need much water only going to be used for misting one maybe two tanks.

Thanks,
Nathan
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Should I get a filter that does RO only or one that does RO/DI will I need DI for anything?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
BulkReef has two similar systems, they are the same price but one is RO and one is RO / DI which would you recommend?
 

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Should I get a filter that does RO only or one that does RO/DI will I need DI for anything?
Just my opinion, but (for non-reef tank applications) unless you have a real high TDS for your supply water, or an RO membrane with poor rejection, DI probably just adds one more thing to maintain and buy replacement consumables for. I bypass the DI stage on one of my RO systems, and didn't even add one to the second, and use the straight RO water for frogs, freshwater tanks, houseplants, cooking, drinking water, etc. My supply water TDS runs around 200-300 PPT (varying seasonally), and my RO water runs about 5 - 10 PPT.

Assuming you get an RO system that uses standard 10" cartridges, there's not a great deal of difference between any of the vendors as far as the basic hardware -- you can, however, run into differences in quality of filters, assembly, instructions, and support.

For feeding a misting system, the system I use has a deep sediment filter, catalytic carbon cartridge, chloramine buster*, a 75 GPD RO membrane, and an auto shut-off valve (ASOV). I run the line from this to a float valve in a little reservoir tank (I use a polyethylene dog-food storage container with a lid) that also has a bulkhead fitting to feed the misting pump.

(*my local water district uses "surface reservoirs" (lakes) for water supply, and in the summer has a habit of cranking the chloramine levels very high to kill off algae taste in the water; I had issues (losing stock in reef tanks, mainly, even after a DI stage) every summer until I figured this out; if your local water treatment uses chloramines, I'd suggest considering using a specialty chloramine filter)
 

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BulkReef has two similar systems, they are the same price but one is RO and one is RO / DI which would you recommend?
Probably the RO only. Bulk Reef has great support on their RO stuff -- I'd suggest maybe using their contact page to tell them what you want to do with it, how you want to hook it up, and (if possible) what your tapwater is like (many water districts now just post periodic water quality test results online), and ask them to suggest a parts list for one of their "build your own" systems to do exactly what you need. This should give you a good deal on just the right parts for your application, without buying additional stuff you don't need. I've known three or four people who have done this and are very happy with the system they ended up with.
 

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Chuck,

I eventually plan to run my RO into a reservoir with the float as well. I was thinking of using a large plastic trash can or something similar in size.

See any issues with this? Anything else you recommend that may be better?
I've done a few different things, and have been about happiest with one of these (not sure if that's the brand, but it looks like mine; I didn't use the wheels). It's hopefully a food-safe plastic, it seals to keep the dust and spiders out, it doesn't break like glass, has a small footprint but room for the float valve, holds enough to run for a day or two worth of misting even with the RO system off, but not enough to make an enormous mess if it should decide to leak. Plus it's easier to drill than glass, but not as brittle as some plastics I've tried to drill.
 

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I am eyeing:
BRS 4 Stage Value RO/DI System - 75GPD - Bulk Reef Supply

Are 5 micron filters small enough to keep the mistking nozzles clear or should I try to find one with a 1 micron filter.
The sediment filter is to reduce clogging in the next cartridge stages and the membrane; you shouldn't have anything as big as one micron past the RO membrane regardless. A 1 micron filter might increase the amount of life you get out of the carbon cartridges behind it, but the tradeoff is that the 1 micron filter itself will clog faster and need to be changed more often.

Lately I've been using a 5 micron "ROSaveZ" depth sediment filter; it's more expense than the cheaper sediment filters (six bucks instead of three, not a big deal), but it runs much longer, keeping me from having to change filters as often.
 

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I've done a few different things, and have been about happiest with one of these (not sure if that's the brand, but it looks like mine; I didn't use the wheels). It's hopefully a food-safe plastic, it seals to keep the dust and spiders out, it doesn't break like glass, has a small footprint but room for the float valve, holds enough to run for a day or two worth of misting even with the RO system off, but not enough to make an enormous mess if it should decide to leak. Plus it's easier to drill than glass, but not as brittle as some plastics I've tried to drill.


Was thinking trash can so I had plenty of water available. That way I can use it for mist and also have a ball valve hooked up to fill gallon jugs as well. I don't think this size will allow that. Though I do like the way it seals though.
 

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Was thinking trash can so I had plenty of water available. That way I can use it for mist and also have a ball valve hooked up to fill gallon jugs as well. I don't think this size will allow that. Though I do like the way it seals though.
Your mileage may vary of course, but I've not had great long term luck storing large amounts of water in trash cans (even the good Rubbermade Brutes); sooner or later they all seem to deform, split, leak around fittings, etc.

A slightly more expensive (but a bit less problem prone, perhaps) alternative might be to add a pressure tank. I use a 4 gallon pressure tank on one of my systems, and this gives me an effective three gallons or so of water on tap (without waiting for the RO unit to produce it). I use it for hand misting, watering plants, filling 3 gallon water cooler bottles, cooking, etc. They're available in a fairly large range of sizes. If you go this route, a permeate pump helps re-pressurize the tank much faster after you drain it.
 

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I should note that I have the float valve set at around 3/4 full on the trash can. If you go more than this it does seem to try and deform/ bulge out. I'm using a Rubbermaid Brute.
 

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We dropped R/O setups from our lineup last year after I tested a couple different brands... The prices online just can't compete with the quality of what's available in hardware stores nowadays in my experience... It's just the way it is, I suppose. :) (If I can't beat them, why sell a lesser product?)

Whirlpool R/O System @ Lowes

It's not the highest GPD, but considering it comes with a faucet, line tap, 5G reservoir with auto-shutoff, and a sensor that tells you when you need to replace the cartridges... For $146 when it's NOT on sale... (I think we picked our last one up for $119.99 on sale) Honestly I've used three different brands online, and I wouldn't go back to the others... At all... That cheap unit keeps up with 50+ misting nozzles spraying for a total of about 4-6 minutes daily, plus water for plants, plus water for Geckos, plus water for Jess & I. :p I've had the current setup running for over a year with not a single clogged misting head. I'm not saying it's the most efficient or best R/O system out there by any means, but for the price, it's a great little setup.

One online brand (not mentioned in this thread so far...) had two separate lines burst in my home on two separate occasions. (Once when I wasn't home for 6+ hours before I noticed it!) If Whirlpool's unit did that, we have a huge major brand name with warranties to back it all up. The other company basically told me I was "SOL". :mad: (PM me, if you'd like to know who...)

Obviously I have nothing to gain by posting this, so take it for what it is. That cheap little whirlpool unit is sweet. :D
 

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Some things to think about: do you want to hook the RO up to a faucet at your kitchen sink, and maybe the ice maker? If so you need a pressurized storage tank, and MOST importantly an automatic shut off. The automatic shut off stops water from flowing through your RO system when you are not making water. Most RO's put 3 gallons of waste water to the drain for each gallon of RO water it makes up. A 75 gpd RO will use 300 gallons of water per day if just left running.

Do you want to turn the unit on and off manually to make water, or would you just like to have water available at any given time. Remember that 75 gallons a day is running soft warm water at 75 - 80 psi. Most people will get less performance in reality.
 

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We dropped R/O setups from our lineup last year after I tested a couple different brands... The prices online just can't compete with the quality of what's available in hardware stores nowadays in my experience... It's just the way it is, I suppose. :) (If I can't beat them, why sell a lesser product?)

Obviously I have nothing to gain by posting this, so take it for what it is. That cheap little whirlpool unit is sweet. :D
I have this model myself, and I like it. Quick change filters that are easy to replace, and the light goes off every 6 months to tell you it is timre to change the filters.

The main draw backs are the cost of replacement filters, and it does not operate well at lower pressures, say less than 40 PSI.
 
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