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I knock off most the excess coco coir then I vacuum the rest after the silicone cures that way I can see where there are bare spots. Once I am happy with the results I make sure there is good ventilation so the enclosure can air out and mist the coco coir regularly to help the acetic acid smell go away.

If I keep the enclosure sealed for an hour and open it up and do not smell much acetic acid I will plant the enclosure.

Ricky
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I knock off most the excess coco coir then I vacuum the rest after the silicone cures that way I can see where there are bare spots. Once I am happy with the results I make sure there is good ventilation so the enclosure can air out and mist the coco coir regularly to help the acetic acid smell go away.

If I keep the enclosure sealed for an hour and open it up and do not smell much acetic acid I will plant the enclosure.

Ricky
Thanks for the tip. Sounds easy enough.
 

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It 's probably just my experience in a colder climate, but when building my one and only viv (so far), I found that the acid smell from the silicone curing didn't dissipate for a LONG time (more than a couple of weeks). There's at least one thread I found on dendroboard that suggested it might actually be the coir that's absorbing the acetic acid, rather than the silicone failing to cure.
It wasn't until I tried "rinsing" the viv with the misting system that things improved. It took about 5 good full false bottom soakings before the pH of the runoff was high enough to be confident the acetic acid was completely removed.
 
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