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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just got a Rhaphidophora cryptantha cutting from GlassBoxTropicals (pic below), love the look of the leaves and am really trying to not kill it. I've found very little on the required care for these in a vivarium, one thread from 2013 mentioned they need high light, however other googling shows sources suggesting shade or indirect light...just wondering if anyone here has any experience with this plant and can advise on proper location within the vivarium. Also, should I be trying to tie the growing end of the vine to the background/cork bark?

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E. Anthonyii Santa Isabels
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Perhaps try mounting it to that cork there? (Or some where else, if you prefer). It should climb.
I just got a different raphidophora and I’m planning to mount it on my background cork.
 

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I can give some very general advice that will hopefully be somewhat useful - I just traded some viv stuff for a R. tetraspermia cutting last week - not the same species, I know, but it's the same genus. I wrapped moss around the aerial roots and stuck that ball into some ABG mix. So far it is still alive with no signs of wilting or decline.

FWIW, I think plant care guidelines online tend to be pretty bad because houseplant enthusiasts as a community don't seem to use any objective measurements to quantify what they mean by "high" or "low" light, humidity, etc. As such, I would probably provide it with as much artificial light as you can - it's really hard to give plants too much light in a vivarium with artificial lighting. If you were to measure the foot candles with a light meter, even directly under vivarium lights we're usually barely at the equivalent of the shade outdoors. (I have managed to fry leaves on a couple plants with LED floodlights and spotlights that focus the beam, but I am not sure if that was due to too much light, or actual heat put off by the bulbs. I have never had issues with non-focused LEDs)

Good luck, it's a cool looking plant. When it takes off I'll totally buy/trade for a piece of it if you're interested.
 

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I like the way you have it planted now. I plant all of my Rhaphidophoras this way where you wrap the bottom of the cutting then park it up against something vertical. It will start to shingle then it will choose its own path and this will tell you something about its preferences. Mine grows on my cork mosaic background but it seems to prefer the sphagnum in the gaps over the cork surface itself. It will grow on either. Light doesn't seem to be much of an issue but the tank I have it in is probable medium-high light. Since it grows vertically, it is never receiving the full brunt of the light due to oblique angles, so I would guess it can manage with medium or even lower light. It is an awesome plant and I wish it would put off more offshoots that I could snip and start in other tanks. Those have been my observations, anyway. As always, YMMV :)

Mark
 

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FWIW, I think plant care guidelines online tend to be pretty bad because houseplant enthusiasts as a community don't seem to use any objective measurements to quantify what they mean by "high" or "low" light, humidity, etc. As such, I would probably provide it with as much artificial light as you can - it's really hard to give plants too much light in a vivarium with artificial lighting. If you were to measure the foot candles with a light meter, even directly under vivarium lights we're usually barely at the equivalent of the shade outdoors. (I have managed to fry leaves on a couple plants with LED floodlights and spotlights that focus the beam, but I am not sure if that was due to too much light, or actual heat put off by the bulbs. I have never had issues with non-focused LEDs)

Good luck, it's a cool looking plant. When it takes off I'll totally buy/trade for a piece of it if you're interested.
Completely agree with the vague care guidelines for plants. Every plant I have, there has been a learning curve to figure out optimal conditions regardless of the amount of reading up I have done. (Most of my plants are in individual pots in humidomes where I can easily shuffle them around rather than in a viv where they are rooted and can't easily be moved to experiment with better conditions)

And I will disagree with giving plants unlimited amounts of light. I have found that the led lights that I use are too intense for many of my plants and have to find creative ways to arrange them to provide shade and actually angle the lights so that they aren't directly hitting the plants. It is not a temperature issue. Too much light for sure. That being said, in viv conditions, there is often much more shadows and diffused light from the hardscape and broms etc.

I have found that newly arrived plants or fresh cuttings are especially susceptible to being damaged under too much light. Once they establish, they can handle more light.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks everyone for the advice, since posting there’s already been some growth at the tip pointing straight up towards the light! So going to keep the position for now, might shift it a little bit so the tip of the vine is closer to the cork bark if it doesn’t start moving itself.

Connerology, I really hope I get enough growth from this to be able to trade in the future!
 
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