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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello my name is Jace. I have recently been thinking hard about returning to dart frogging. So let me tell you my story and plans for the future.

Sometime around 2003-2004 I saw an episode of Jeff Corwin's show that featured a little tiny gold frog. I was very curious about this little dart frog and in my research I found out you could actually keep similar animals. This led to more research and I found black jungle terrarium supply. This is also in the midst of the poker boom which I exploited rather well and that was the seed money for all my purchases. After a few months of planning and viv building I purchased 2 azureus froglets, nothing could prepare me for how tiny they were, a fraction of their adult size. In time I added a few frogs to my personal collection, a pair of Brazilian red headed tincs and some galactonotous. By this time the Azureus were breeding regularly and I had decided I wanted to grow the babies up to breeding pairs of their own. I think I got about 10 healthy adult pairs before I moved the Azureus to a bigger cage and they stop breeding for a while. These guys seem to breed like rabbits, add water and food and they do the rest.

Okay so to this point everything is going good. I actually was breaking kind of even on my hobby because I think I sold the pairs for about $150 a pair. I formed a partnership with a friend of mine and we began dart frogging as a team pooling resources to breed fruit flies and diversify our food supplies for our darts. I think at one point we had like 4 different types of fruit flies. D. melonagaster, D. hydei, D. buzzati and alternate hydei and melonagaster strains. Then we had rice flour beetles, i think 2 kinds of springtails. My personal favorite food was the spiders that lived in the room with my frogs. So many loose fruit flies means you have spiders. I put the egg sacs in jars and harvested the spiders, I would usually lower the spiders down into waiting frog mouths on their own webs. It was slow and time consuming but the frogs loved it.

So now things are growing at a crazy rate, pooling our resources means we can basically get anything we want and we want it all. We make some great trades with some of the frogs we breed to get in on the (at that time )new shipments of pumilio. These we called Almirante, and later man creek. I remember typing man creek into a post and somebody said, is that what we are calling these now, I thought works for me. ( on a side not I am curious what the end result of this was) We also had a breeding pair of D. Reticulatus, a big group of vents which I totally love. One of my favorite pairs I had though were imitator.Some other tinctorius stuff I cant seem to recall. At this point the collections were still split half at my house and half as his apartment which eventually he moved out of and could not take his frogs with him to his new place. I instantly inherited like 10-15 tanks with probably 30 frogs total. This on top of the 3 or 4 breeding groups I have plus my non breeding frogs. This includes any tadpoles and eggs that need additional rearing. plus all the pumilio froglets that you cant even count cause you are not even sure how many there are in there. Which is the fun part about pumilio, I love pumilio.

It was cool though cause he promised to come over every day and work in the lab as we called it. Then he started missing a day here or there, then missing fruit fly production day which was considered mandatory. After a while we just parted ways, but since he had no where for the frogs to go I kept everything. Interested deal for me, we build a partnership, hard to put a cash value on the whole thing and in the end its all mine. This actually left me a little bummed and ultimately led to my leaving the hobby.


The fun had been fully squeezed out of it for me. I mean I had so many frogs the only way I could afford to feed them was to make my own fruit fly medium recipe from dirt cheap stuff. Which is okay, but I also had to use the Ed's fly meat reusable cups ,because it would cost me a fortune to use disposable cups. So every week I had to clean out 20 fruit fly cups and mix another batch. This is not so bad, but thats just the tip of the iceberg. All of our tanks were setup on the cheap they all needed regular maintenance and to be hand misted every day. This is easy and fun with a tank or 2 but when you have a room full of them and then a bunch of froglets to boot it can take an hour or more to mist all those tanks. These are the things that seemed to be grating on me, I was spending at least 3 hours a day on dart frogging. Which doesnt seem that bad now, but at the time I wanted out. So thats what I did, I sold it all.

Now Im thinking of getting back into frogging, but minus the mistakes I made last time. This time I want 1 tank with 1 morph of pumilio. I want the tank to be more self reliant than my last tanks. I want the pumilio be from a very well referenced person with locale data that I believe and does not change right after I get attached to them. This approach to one type of frog i think will mean I can fully concentrate on them and their specific needs. I will be better able to attend to young froglets when they are not lost in a sea of green that covers and entire room.

My questions to you guys are, what is new in the hobby as whole. What pumilio are new? Where does one get pumilio these day. Are there still shipments coming in, are these frogs legal and with legit locale data? Are there any man creek / chiriqui still around from those original imports. Is there anybody still around from back then, say hi if you remember me I probably remember you.
 

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Welcome back. Sounds like you're on the right track, but I'm afraid the pumilio situation hasn't improved much. Imports still come in on a pretty regular basis but without locale data, just names based on a best guess of where they were collected. There are some locale-specific lines out there, mostly originating from Rich Frye. Man Creek/Almirante are still a confused mess, some say they are the same frog, some swear they are different, and the names have been used somewhat interchangeably over the years. I know of one Man Creek import that was supposed to be locale specific brought in by Kevin Moser. Chiriqui are still out there as well, but I don't know off the top of my head if there are any locale-specific lines.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I think I meant yellow head. If i recall though they were more orange. Really interesting looking guys.

1. interesting thing I noticed was that Pumilio are now reclassified. Look like amazonicus and reticulatus did too. Thats interesting I really always thought these guys were night and day different than your standard Dendrobate.

A few more questions. I fully expected to find some great podcast and youtube channels. I cannot seem to find much of either. Does anyone know any podcasts or youtube that puts out quality videos on a regular basis. If not someone please start this up. I fully intend to put a lot of youtube vids up if I do take the leap of dart frogging again. A podcast though I would be super interested in hearing one about dart frogs.
 
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