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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like for this thread to be dedicated to how best to create a tank for Reticulatus .

i.e. Water? Running Water? Specific plant recommendations? Film Cannisters? Cannister Locations? Etc.

I would really like to hear from people who successfully breed these frogs. What can you tell us about how to keep them?

Thanks in advance,

Scott
Sanford, Maine
 

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I’m also keen to hear recommendations for retic tanks. The tank I’m currently playing with is designed for retics, and is only based on things I’ve read here and there. Here is what I’ve come up with so far:

Dimensions
24"L x 20"W x 20"H (40g) which is large for such tiny creatures, but I hear they like their space and I like details that larger tanks afford.

Water feature
This is where I was unsure and a little reluctant to add moving water, but in the end I went for a very slow and confined drip wall area which forms shallow pools of water on the back wall. The extent of water on ground may be a small pool or no feature at all (haven’t decided).

Substrate
When I have the time to start landscaping it will be leaf litter with the odd moss patch.

Plants
Unsure.

Like Scott, I would like to know what retics generally prefer. Any pictures of some setups (or setups in progress) would also be appreciated.
 

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Retic Setup

Scott and Will,

I can't speak as to what the retics actually prefer (as they've only been in one setup), but I can share with you my limited experience. Hopefully Christina, Patrick, Sean, or someone else with more experience will chime in and give some more info.

The retics are definetely ground dwellers and when setting up a tank I would design it more like a tinc tank than a typical thumbnail tank (more ground space than height, but bigger the tank the better). With that said, my are in the same setup that has worked for me in breeding imitator and lamasi, which is essentially a vertical 10gal-style setup. For no other reason than experimentation, I used coco bricks as the substrate (vivaria.nl) covered with sphagnum then sheet moss and a little leaf litter. The coco bricks have worked great for the thumnails because they form little caves and cracks which gives them more places to hide - and in my opinion security and the willingness to breed consistently.

Similar to the imitator they seems to like to lay their eggs on overlapping leaves. They're tank is nicely filled out with creeping fig and another plant (can't remember what it's called) which has leaves about the same size as the fig but thicker. I opted for film canisters over bromeliads in my thumbnail tanks as I don't want to disturb they're tank looking for eggs and would much rather just reach in the tank every week or two, take out the tads, and replace the film canisters. The film canisters by the way are located right near the floor of the tank and are angled at about 60deg, half filled with water.

As far as the background, I like the flat cork bark, which has a nice look and allows for the plants to root and climb quickly. I also lay ghostwood logs at angles from about the bottom front of the tank to top back. This gives the tanks great depth and a much more usable volume for the frogs.

I don't have a water feature in their tank, but have used them with thumbnails before. It's definetely not a necessity but if it's something you like, go for it. I would suggest if you are to, go slow and small and have aquatic plants to cover the surface.

They love springtales even as adults so make sure to have plenty on hand. Mine are fed about half/half melanogaster and hydei (which is amazing to see them gobble down!), dusted at every feeding.

Hopefully this helps you guys some, feel free to ask me to repeat if I've said something confusing or if you have more questions. Good luck and take care,

-=Adam=-
 

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My setup is very basic and pretty simple. 5 gallon glass aquarium (like 5 bucks at wal-mart) - Gravel with small "pool" on one end, sphagnum (seeded with springtails), live moss, some type of small plant (in that order). Some have a very small piece of driftwood. I have tried film canisters and petri under clay pot, both work equally well and really depends on the individual frogs as to which they will use more. I find the petris are a lot easier to deal with. I have found that given height, they tend to stick to the ground anyway so tall tanks not necessary. With this setup I keep only sexed pairs. I'm sure bigger would work but again, doesn't seem necessary. If you want to try in groups, definitely go with a bigger enclosure. I seed all my tanks with springtails and try to keep a supply of them going in the tank at all times. I also feed them dusted ff's. This is what works for me, but is certainly not the only way or even the "best" way. Hope this helps. Robb
 

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Here is a pciture of my retic tank. (thanks robb, for 2 of them)
They seem to like the tank so far and are very bold. I can not speak for breeding them, but for my three they seem ok in this, which is a custom tank, and a little bigger than a 10gal vert. They seem to like the leaf litter, and the tanks should grow fast.



Scott said:
I would like for this thread to be dedicated to how best to create a tank for Reticulatus .

i.e. Water? Running Water? Specific plant recommendations? Film Cannisters? Cannister Locations? Etc.

I would really like to hear from people who successfully breed these frogs. What can you tell us about how to keep them?

Thanks in advance,

Scott
Sanford, Maine
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hey Adam... in your post you mention Coco bricks from Vivaria.nl

I think you meant Peat Bricks? I've used them in the past... actually have a tank with them now (no frogs in it though - it's a 90g corner tank awaiting refurbishing).

I've used Coco bricks to make coco fiber subtrate before. I'm kind of wondering if they've made something new.

s
 

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Scott,

Sorry, you're right they're peat bricks from vivaria, which I got at Pondside Herp Supply.

I actually got to go to the Vivaria store in Amsterdam a few years ago and they had a number of tanks that were setup with them that had been running with pumps, and misting systems for more than 10 years without the peat bricks degrading. After I saw their amazing setups I had to try it for myself! So anyway, nothing new, but a great (and cheap) product,

-=Adam=-
 
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