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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I remember reading somewhere that mosses can be harmful for the roots of epiphytic plants. Is this also the case for Sphagnum Moss that was once used as the planting medium behind the epiphytic plant? Should I try to remove as much live sphagnum from the plant displayed in the image below as possible?

Thank you.
Plant Flowerpot Houseplant Terrestrial plant Purple
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
becomes overly acidic and can easily become anaerobic if it is the only substrate/media.
Thanks for pointing that out, I must admit that I didn't even consider such a possibility. Now I'm also interested to hear more as I've often heard people recommending planting plants like Marcgravia with sphagnum around its roots. Granted it wouldn't be the only media, but it would be concentrated around the plant's base. I wonder if one were to water the plant sufficiently regularly whether the acidity would also be washed away or neutralized. I also often see only sphagnum being used as the substrate for tropical plant nurseries as well, granted the pot with sphagnum is only meant to be temporary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you all for your responses.

probably should try to trim back the growth to prevent it from swallowing the plants, so I would prune the moss on that particular piece to keep it in check
I'm assuming that if I were to just leave the plant on the moss pad after plucking out all of the revived moss, I'll constantly have to go back trim new moss growth? Or is it unlikely to come back?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
you'll need to diligently pluck any bit that grows for a while until you've managed to get all the live sections
I guess I'll go with this and then periodically trim whatever's left as Marcgravia El Coca are notorious for taking forever to establish and I'd rather not spend months waiting for it to get reestablished and undo part of the factored-in cost that the six or so months that it took to established and send out new shoots. Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Keen to hear what you decide and how it fares.
I'm not quite sure how thick it is yet as the plant haven't arrived, but I'll keep you updated as to what I decide. If it's anything like the Sphagnum pads I've seen before, it'll most likely have a plastic core or something with just some sphagnum wrapped around it, making it thinner than it appears.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
@mattoid
An update: the plant finally arrived. Lost at least three "big," mature leaves in the shipping which really unfortunate, but I've stuck those leaves in some sphagnum in their own grow-out cup so maybe (hopefully) something will come out of it.

The sphagnum mount is 1.5 inches thick which is thicker than I'd anticipated so it wouldn't fit where I'd intended to place it. It's comprised of sphagnum wrapped around a plastic core. The sphagnum layer itself is only about a centimeter thick if not less so it's probably not thick enough to cause bog-like conditions. I've plucked out all of the living sphagnum that was especially long and blocking the leave's access to light.

My current plan for it is to leave it alone on its current mount and hope that it sends up some shoots up my cork bark background and once those shoots seem healthy enough, I'll cut it from the main plant and then repeat this process. Or maybe I'll just leave it permanently there. Unfortunately, it sticks out like a sore thumb in my tank.

As it is now, due to the shipping damage and how hard it'd be to extract the plant from the mount (the plant appears to only possess adventitious roots), it's probably best to leave it on its mount. I'd thought of sawing the mount in half since I won't need its back half, but I can't imagine a hand saw being that useful against sphagnum — the blades will probably just get caught and a grand mess will be made. Let me know if you think that's a good idea.

Plant Wood Organism Trunk Terrestrial plant

Plant Botany Houseplant Terrestrial plant Flowering plant
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
@mattoid
Final update:
After a few days I finally decided that it was too much of an eyesore so I got to work.
I used a cutter to remove all of the fishing lines that were holding the sphagnum in place and then ripped out all of the sphagnum on the back half of the sphagnum block. It turns out the center wasn't some box made from poster board but some plastic bricks. The sphagnum in front seems to be holding together pretty well with just the plant's roots. Fingers crossed it remains that way. A lot of sphagnum was removed, significantly reducing the weight (probably due to how much water the sphagnum had.

Leftover sphagnum:
Product Ingredient Material property Seasoning Cuisine



Once that was done I cleaned the glass using water (since there were frogs in the tank so I didn't want to risk alcohol and used super glue + cotton to attach the block to the glass on its plastic bits. The tank is currently being ventilated with a fan to reduce fumes. It's front doors are also slightly ajar. I've done this before in a tank with frogs and didn't see any ill affects.

Result:
Side view: It's a lot less thick than before, but it's still unfortunately quite bulky. C'est la vie
Plant Branch Terrestrial plant Wood Automotive tire


Back view: a bit of a messy job, but it was pretty hard to glue things together. I intend to add some more cotton later.
Water Window Wood Tints and shades Tree


Front view:
Plant Organism Terrestrial plant Bedrock Wood


Freed up spot (fresh leaves): I might add the Alocasia Azlanii that was once there back or I might just leave it be. Undecided since my tank is currently only has South American plants at the moment.
Plant Wood Leaf Leaf vegetable Terrestrial plant
 
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